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Diana Kander Joins the cmi Family!

By Diana Kander | Apr 10, 2022 | Comments Off

 

Diana demonstrates why curiosity is your greatest asset to drive constant innovation and help your company thrive

A highly sought-after keynote speaker, innovation consultant and New York Times bestselling author, Diana demonstrates why curiosity is your greatest asset to drive constant innovation. She teaches you how to challenge your own assumptions and ask thought-provoking questions. A serial entrepreneur who entered the United States as a refugee at the age of 8, she has launched and sold millions of dollars’ worth of products and services.

Diana delivers an engaging and captivating program that walks leaders and teams through specific ways to boost innovation and ultimately future-proof the organization.

“Diana delivered an on-point message about entrepreneurship and innovation which was a perfect complement to our program and was one of the highlights for our more than 400 attendees. Not only was Diana’s talk anchored in data and evidence, it also included plenty of relevant personal anecdotes as well as a dose of humor. In addition, she helped us structure a reaction panel for her talk which made every one of her points come through that much stronger for our audience.” Grupo Guayacan, Inc

Diana knows how to build a business from the ground up. Her first book, All In Startup, has been used by over 100 universities in their innovation courses and countless large organizations to help their employees think more like entrepreneurs. Her second book, The Curiosity Muscle walks readers through a methodology to keep curiosity alive and thriving inside of an organization, ultimately, future-proofing the business.

Diana’s most-popular programs, delivered in person or virtually, include:

Why Curiosity is the Ultimate Competitive Advantage

This keynote explains exactly why most companies reaching the peak of their potential lose their curiosity and crash into irrelevance. From how we develop blind spots about our business, to the pitfalls of feeling like an expert, this thought-provoking, engaging program reveals the smokescreens obscuring imminent threats to long-term viability. It walks you through specific ways to boost innovation, uncover customer needs, solve problems, create new value for customers, and increase employee engagement. Most importantly, Diana demonstrates why curiosity is your greatest asset to drive constant innovation and help your company thrive and compete on more than price alone — ultimately, future-proofing your business.

ROI & Key Outcomes:
  • How you can institutionalize curiosity, ask better questions to stay competitive and relevant to your customers and drive growth
  • How you can dramatically reduce the risk of new ideas and create a more innovative culture that leads to results
  • How to determine pitfalls within your organization and avoid falling into the “expert trap"

Ideal Audiences:
For All Company Meetings

Increasing the Speed of Innovation

The pace of change in today’s economy requires innovative, value-adding ideas to come from all parts of your organization – whether they are internal improvements or new sources of revenue. The way managers were traditionally trained stifles innovation and forces out-of-the-box thinkers out of the company. This interactive presentation outlines the must-have skill sets to effectively lead your employees. Diana will provide the framework for how your organization – and the people within it – can flourish in this hyper-competitive world.

ROI & Key Outcomes:

  • Learn new skill sets required of the innovative leader
  • Avoid common pitfalls of innovative leadership
  • Create an internal culture of innovation so that every employee is a resource to the effort

Ideal Audiences:
For Executives & Managers

How to Compete on Value Instead of Price

This presentation teaches a methodology used by both entrepreneurs and established organizations to continuously create new value for their customers. You will learn the key questions you must ask in order to uncover value-creating opportunities, as well as precisely how to ask them to effectively yield useful insights. Questions like: are you competing on price or value with your customers? If your focus is on value (which it should be), are you missing some key blindspots in your product or service? Are you measuring true data about the health of your project or just relying on vanity metrics that are concealing what’s really going on?

ROI & Key Outcomes:

  • Change the way you solicit feedback from customers to make it more actionable
  • Learn the key customer questions that will uncover value-creating opportunities.
  • Learn detailed examples to improve curiosity, creativity and leadership skills

Ideal Audiences:
For Sales Meetings

Diana is captivating and thought-provoking and provides provides highly tailored presentations – audiences leave with real world examples and takeaways to ensure success.

To learn more about creating a lasting impact at your next event, connect with us here.

 

 

Your Best People are Leaving, and Sam Silverstein knows why

By cmiadmin | Mar 26, 2019 | Comments Off

Learn more about Sam Silverstein here!

It's Not About You - Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Sep 20, 2016 | Comments Off

9-20-1-300x206It’s not about you – it’s about them!
The focus of an influencer is always on the audience.
If you are a speaker – it’s about the people listening to you.
If you are in sales – it’s about your customer or prospect.
If you are a leader – it’s about the people you are leading.
If you are a teacher – it’s about your students.
If you are a parent – it’s about your children

Almost everyone has this backwards. They think being influential means they need to become polished or powerful. Influence, though, is all about the audience. Be it an audience of one or one thousand. When it’s about them, they get it, and we grow in their eyes.

By thinking out instead of in, by concentrating on others instead of on us, a tremendous transformation takes place. We go from inner directed to outer directed, from taker to giver, from self-centered to others-focused, from tightfisted to generous, from shortsighted to farsighted, from selfish to selfless. We begin to see and act on behalf of others’ needs ahead of our own; our thoughts are in terms of “we” instead of “me.”

See More from Ty!

People Do Business With People They Know, Like, Trust and Value - Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Sep 19, 2016 | Comments Off

Ty Bennett Promo Video ShotThere’s a fundamental rule of business that states: “People do business with people they know, like and trust.” We’ve all heard that, and even repeated it, but ultimately it is wrong.

Ok, maybe wrong is not the right word. But the rule is incomplete. The truth is, people do business with people they know, like, trust and VALUE.

Honesty and likeability are important, but if people don’t see you as valuable, they will never do business with you. If you don’t come across as professional, knowledgeable, and credible with the right skill set to get the job done, you will never be as influential and successful as you would like.

So what do we do about it? How do we make ourselves more valuable? By constantly developing our knowledge, our skills and continually striving to get better. The fundamental rule of Business should read: “People do business
with people they know, like, trust and value”

Reputation is your track record. It is confidence in character and capability over time. Henry Ford said, “You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do,” so reputation only comes after you make the investment. Lasting influence is built and sustained by reputation. People can be influential in a given situation, or for a temporary period of time, but lasting influence is based in reputation. That is why it is so important to guard your reputation, cultivate your reputation, and be a person of character and ever-increasing capability.

See More from Ty!

The company with no secrets - Mike Walsh

By cmiadmin | Sep 15, 2016 | Comments Off

Does radical transparency work, or is it just a culture gimmick?


Some of the b1-0sgbkbljrg0x5w39pp28ugiggest sources of stress inside organizations are secrets. When a new boss is appointed, merger talks begin or layoffs are rumored, everyone goes into threat response mode. Personal survival is paramount, and people lose focus and stop creating valuable work.

Some companies are seeking to address this issue by making as much information available as is legally possible. The social media startup Buffer for example, publishes a report every month detailing the growth in its user base, revenue and total cash position. It publishes how much is paid to its workers and how it calculates those numbers. Strangely, rather than deterring employees, this approach has actually led to more job applications.

When I interviewed Brian Halligan, the CEO of Hubspot, he told me the story of how a few years into starting his business he had joined a group of CEOs who met regularly in Boston. At one particular meeting, the topic was culture. Brian had gone to the session thinking that the subject was a complete waste of time, until he sat next to the CEO of iRobot — who was not only brilliant but read him the riot act on culture. That same week, Hubspot surveyed their employees, and discovered that only half of them really liked working there. At that point he and his team decided to study the issue intensely. Their key assumption was that if the way people work and live had changed, the way they led and organized people also had to adapt.

Brian quickly realized that the real issue was transparency. Secrets created politics, especially in fast growing companies. He wanted his employees to trust him, and for him to be able to implicitly trust them too. They started sharing more information. They posted the notes from boardroom meetings on the wiki. They adopted a single policy of “use good judgment”. Employees could submit questions, which would be handled at the company meeting.

In Brian’s words, they had their toughest employees monitor the founders at this session, to make sure that none of them got let off the hook. And yet, ironically enough, it was similar attempts to get off the hook that recently got Hubspot in trouble, their CMO fired, and an FBI investigation triggered by alleged attempts to hush the bestselling book, ‘Disrupted’ by former employee Dan Lyons.

Extreme disclosure is not for everyone, especially when it comes at the price of surveillance. At $150 billion hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, the firm has a policy of taping all meetings. A recent complaint by a former employee described the environment of constant video surveillance as a ‘cauldron of fear and intimidation’. According to the report by the NYT, recordings of controversial meetings were frequently archived and later shown to employees as part of the company’s policy of learning from mistakes.

Secrets can be powerful. They can protect the vulnerable, keep competitors at bay, and safeguard national interests. But they can also breed mistrust and in companies, divert energy from more productive pursuits.

So as you weigh up the design of your own culture — ask yourself, how much time do the people in your business spend worrying about their own survival rather than the survival of your business?

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