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Posts by Ty Bennett

Ability Will Make A Name For Yourself, Mentoring Future Leaders Will Make An Impact On The World

By Ty Bennett | Nov 05, 2019 | Comments Off

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As leaders, we want our organization to thrive. We want growth, profits, success, and impact. We want to make a difference and maybe even change the world. But the truth of the matter is—we can’t achieve any of that on our own. Those things don’t come from you or me. They come from individuals who are excited to take our lead and run with it. Not simply followers—but followers who become future leaders in their own sphere of influence. 

The foundational role of a leader is to make themselves less necessary.

This statement may seem counterintuitive to you, and it may even hit your ego a bit, but it is the truth. Often as leaders, it is difficult for us to allow others to grow because it attacks our own insecurities. Instead, we continue doing what we have always done, and settle for leading those who are simply willing to follow. The problem with allowing our ego to take the lead is that in doing so, our ego is fighting what we actually desire. 

As leaders, we want our organization to thrive. We want growth, profits, success, and impact. We want to make a difference and maybe even change the world. But the truth of the matter is—we can’t achieve any of that on our own. Those things don’t come from you or me. They come from individuals who are excited to take our lead and run with it. Not simply followers—but followers who become leaders in their own sphere of influence. 

Your greatest success as a leader will come from mentoring future leaders. 

Ralph Nader said it well: “The function of leadership is to produce other leaders, not other followers.” 

That’s the goal. 

And that is what we should all be working towards as leaders.

Mentoring Future Leaders Builds a Legacy 

Our history is filled with stories of great leaders whose influence has spanned the ages—not just because of their own efforts, but because their own efforts significantly impacted others who carried on their legacy. 

 Smokey Robinson is one of those leaders. 

Bob Dylan once called Smokey Robinson, “America’s greatest living poet.” 

Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, William “Smokey” Robinson founded a vocal rhythm and blues group known as, The Miracles, while still in high school. A few years after they were formed, the group began writing songs with an up-and-coming writer and producer, Barry Gordy. Barry was still young and poor, but he had talent and Smokey saw potential in him. Through Smokey’s encouragement, and with borrowed money, Barry Gordy started an R&B label that would later be known as Motown Records—The Miracles were the first group he added to his label.

Barry Gordy was just one of many who benefitted from Smokey Robinson’s ability to see potential and encourage people to rise up to meet that potential. He was the best kind of leader, because he saw the strengths of others and encouraged them to use those strengths to be their own kind of leader. But Smokey’s influence as a leader wasn’t just in his acts of encouragement—it was in his music. 

Robinson’s career as a singer-songwriter spans more than four decades, with hits that were not only great to listen to, but were influential to the music industry, and the future of R&B, pop, and rock ‘n roll. “Shop Around” became Motown’s first #1 hit on the R&B charts, followed by other great songs such as “You’ve Really Got A Hold on Me,” “The Tracks of My Tears,” “Going To The Go-Go,” and “Tears of A Clown.” 

The Miracles dominated the R&B charts through the sixties and seventies, and hundreds of thousands of people were influenced by their music all over the world. In the eighties, after a successful career with his legendary vocal group, Smokey Robinson turned to a solo career where he performed new hits, including, “Just To See Her,” “Quiet Storm,” “Cruisin,” and “Being With You.” 

Over the course of his music career, Smokey Robinson has been inducted into the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame and The Song-Writers Hall of Fame. He has received The Grammy Living Legend Award, honorary doctorates, and awards from Presidents. But the award that sums up Smokey Robinson best is the Q Award, which is given for Outstanding Contribution to Music. Without Smokey Robinson, the course of twentieth-century music would be drastically different. 

Smokey’s voice and hits have inspired artists since the 1960s. In fact, to show their respect, The Beatles covered Smokey’s song, “You’ve Really Got A Hold on Me.” Even this legendary rock ‘n roll band—leaders in their own right—followed the lead of Smokey Robinson, who was a legend himself. 

As a song-writer, Smokey Robinson has over 4000 song credits to his name. He has written songs for The Temptations, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and others. As he served as Vice President of Motown Records, Smokey mentored and produced some of the greatest artists of all time—The Jackson Five, Diana Ross and The Supremes, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, and Stevie Wonder. 

Smokey’s influence goes way beyond his own music and the encouragement he gave a young Barry Gordy. He helped shape many other performers and turned them into legends themselves. His ability made a name for himself, but his mentoring made an impact on the world. 

What Makes Mentoring Effective?

 Mentorship is about legacy. That is the long-term goal. But even in the here-and-now, mentoring future leaders is valuable and significant—it’s about productivity and effectiveness. The word mentor comes from Greek Origin. It was originally used in the Odyssey where Odysseus asked his friend (Mentor) to take care of his son and “raise him up” while he was away for three years at war. Your job is to raise up your team because the more capable your team becomes, the more they can achieve. And the more they are able to achieve, the more successful your organization will be. 

Great leaders recognize that their own reach is limited, but their influence and reach is extended through their team. They understand that it is part of their role to develop a greater capacity in those who they have charge over—because while increasing the capacity of others, they are ultimately increasing their own. They earnestly strive to build a leadership mentality where they seek to instill within their people the very qualities that will one day make them great. In essence, they put every effort into consistently making their people better. 

In my experience, I have found that there are many leaders who believe in mentoring and creating new leaders. If you are reading this article, I would like to assume that you do too. The challenge you may have is how to effectively do this on a day-to-day basis, with all the tasks you already have on your to-do list, and the diversity of characteristics, strengths, and unique personalities on your team. 

Creating new leaders needs to be intentional and strategic. Stepping into the role of a mentor is a step that many leaders don’t take and their leadership reach and impact is limited because of it. Legacy comes as a result of consistent, daily mentoring where a leader takes their team from good to great. That is the pinnacle of leadership and what we should all be working toward in our leadership pursuit.

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If No One Is Following You, Are You A Leader? from Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Nov 05, 2019 | Comments Off

Keynote Speaker Ty Bennett explains why leaders need to think about the people that are following them. Ty is a top global thought leader that speaks on topics such as Leadership, Technology, Sales and Marketing, Business Growth, Engagement, Culture, Customer Service, Performance, Collaboration and Communication.

 

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The Secret of Charisma

By Ty Bennett | Sep 25, 2019 | Comments Off

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“Charisma is a sparkle in people that money can’t buy. It’s an invisible energy with visible effects.” — Marianne Williamson

Is charisma something you are born with or something you can learn?

I am asked this question by leaders and salespeople quite often. 

Charisma is a combination of confidence and people skills and a very special and overlooked ingredient. 

I have a friend named Kenton Worthington who is a successful entrepreneur and the prototype for charisma. He’s positive, confident and great with people. 

However beyond all those fine qualities, he is genuinely focused on other people. That, I’ve decided, is what sets him apart. It’s what gives him that elusive quality of charisma. When you have a conversation with Kenton it’s about you, not about him. He asks questions. He shows real excitement over your successes and concern over your challenges. He finds ways to genuinely compliment whomever he’s talking to and engages in a way that makes the other person feel better about themselves. So to answer my wife’s question, “What is the secret of charisma?” It’s a mix of ingredients – optimism, energy, confidence – but more than anything else, it’s based on outward rather than inward thinking. That’s Kenton’s secret — and, I’m convinced, the secret of other charismatic people — and it’s really no secret at all.

The Secret Of Charisma: Outward Thinking

Here are a few thoughts from others regarding charisma:

It was civil rights activist Cornel West who said, “Humility means two things. One, a capacity for self-criticism … The second feature is allowing others to shine, affirming others, empowering and enabling others. Those who lack humility are dogmatic and egotistical. That masks a deep sense of insecurity. They feel the success of others is at the expense of their own fame and glory.”

“If you would win a man to your cause, said Abraham Lincoln, “first convince him that you are his sincere friend.”

“Some singers want the audience to love them. I love the audience,” said the wildly popular tenor Luciano Pavarotti.

Charisma is the ability to make people feel better about them for having been with you. It’s being more outwardly focused on others, their needs and their interests, rather than focusing on yourself. 

Questions To Ask Yourself About Charisma 

Ask yourself these questions: How do I make people feel after they have met me?  Do they feel inspired and listened to? How are you focusing your attention (inward or outward)? Does their body language portray them as receptive? Are you really listening to what the other person is saying rather than talking about yourself? The answers to these questions are qualities of a partner leader and partnership is the new leadership.  Whether the relationship is within your own company or with your clients and customers, we all need to be a little more like Kenton – a little more charismatic.

Influence is not about YOU - Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Sep 25, 2019 | Comments Off

Ty Bennet shares how to influence people; the secret - make it all about them. Ty explains that when you connect with people and know the most you can about them, influence comes easy. 

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Relatability and Your Reputation - Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Jun 19, 2019 | Comments Off

Learn more about Ty Bennett and his Relevant Leadership keynotes!

Motivational Leadership is Overrated - Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | May 01, 2019 | Comments Off

More from Ty Bennett!

5 Powerfully Simple Presentation Tips - Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Jun 13, 2018 | Comments Off

I get asked for presentation advice all the time, so here are five tips that will help make your presentations more engaging & effective.

  1. Get Rid of Pleasantries

– There is no need to talk about the weather, how grateful you are to be there, to apologize, or reintroduce yourself. You only have a few seconds to grab their attention so start with a question or jump into your content.

  1. Make it Conversational

– Act like you are speaking to one person. Make it conversational. Ask questions. If it is a small group you might create dialogue, with a large audience ask questions and give a pause for people to think about the question. Keep them engaged in the conversation.

Read numbers 3-5 on Ty's blog here!

Learn more about Ty's topics and bio.

Empathy Is A Powerful Leadership Tool

By Ty Bennett | May 10, 2018 | Comments Off

In 2017 I chose Empathy as my word for the year. I studied it and tried to apply it more in my interactions with people. What I discovered is how important empathy is for great leadership.

If we understand that leadership begins and ends with people, then we understand the need to develop relationships, make connections, partner with our people, and show empathy. Read the rest on Ty's website!

Six Ways To Make People Like You - Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Apr 05, 2018 | Comments Off

When it comes to books about networking, building relationships and working with people, the undisputed classic is “How To Win Friends and Influence People.” Dale Carnegie wrote the book in 1936 and it has been read by millions of people since. One of the great realizations in the book is that although some people are more extroverted or affable, working with people is a learned skill that anyone can master.
In the second section of the book, Carnegie offers what he calls “Six Ways To Make People Like You.” These are simple suggestions that can make a huge difference in the way you work with people.

 

 

#1 – Be Genuinely Interested In Other People.

Studies show that the most frequently said word is “I.” People love to talk about themselves, their lives, their hobbies, their families, their passions, etc. When you interact with people, ask questions and allow them to talk, they will love you for it.

#2 – Smile
A smile is a simple gesture that doesn’t cost money, time, or energy but it can brighten someone’s day; it changes the way you feel and makes you more approachable. Smiling is attractive and contagious. People around you can’t help but smile when they see a big smile on your face.

#3 – Remembering and Using People’s Name
They say that the sweetest and most important sound in language is the sound of your own name. In Jack Welch’s book “Winning,” when asked which restaurant was his favorite, he replied: “The one where they know my name.”
We’ve all been there: when you recognize someone but can’t remember their name. It’s awkward, uncomfortable and embarrassing. We often use the excuse that “I am not good with names,” but if you want to master people, you need to begin to remember names. Develop a system. When you meet someone use their name three times in conversation or write their name down in a notebook with some details about them. Figure out a system that works for you.

#4 Be A Good Listener
As the sage saying goes, we were given one mouth and two ears for a reason. We need to encourage others to talk and then we need to listen to understand what they are saying. Listening is much more than being silent. It is an active process. It involves empathy — the ability to walk in someone’s shoes and understand them without judging or fixing.
Listening is a skill that is developed with practice. As you master it, people will like you more and more.

#5 Talk To People In Terms of Their Interests
People love it when you can relate to their interests. Being knowledgeable on subjects they enjoy and capable of engaging in intelligent conversation about what matters most to them says volumes about your interest in who they are.
That doesn’t mean that you have to be an expert in every category, but being able to talk to people in terms of their interests goes a long way. One way to do this is to study topics of interest before meeting with people. If you know that your business lunch is with a huge baseball fan, then take some time to brush up on your knowledge of the game. This small point may make the biggest difference in how the lunch turns out.
Talking in terms of other people’s interests is another way to put them first and leave a great impression. If you have paid attention to the first five ways to make people like you, you are probably noticing a trend. Each of the points is focused on the other person.

#6 Make People Feel Important

Making people feel important can be done in a myriad of ways. You can give a compliment, remember their birthday or a special occasion, recognize them for their skills and contribution, or give them a gift. The key is to make sure you do it sincerely. Your motives must be pure. This is not about giving to get, it is about giving because you care.
People read through individuals who are fake and only in it for themselves. If you are going to compliment someone, make it sincere. Look at the good in people and point that out.

As a boy scout I was taught to leave a campsite better than I found it. I think the same principle applies to people.
Leave every person better for having met you.

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