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Posts by Ty Bennett

Win Business through The Power of Storytelling by Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Apr 05, 2022 | Comments Off
Watch video for Ty Sander's keynote where he shares more on storytelling with 3 ways to bring the audience into the story.

"Decide what differentiates you? What do you want your client to know or believe about you?"

 

Last week I was in Kentucky speaking to Realtors for Berkshire Hathaway. I was sharing The Power of Storytelling and the first question they asked was how do you tell a story that differentiates you but comes across the right way?

In other words, how do you sell yourself without bragging?

This is a crucial story as an influencer for each of us to master - so let me give you the formula.

Step 1. Decide what differentiates you? What do you want your client to know or believe about you?
Examples - You have integrity. You possess unique market knowledge. etc…
Keep in mind that you can’t differentiate yourself by putting down the competition. Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate.

Step 2. Determine where you learned or developed this quality or skill. Who taught it to you? Where did you learn this lesson? Or who/what is a great example of this?
Don’t be the hero of your own story. Determine where this quality came from and build the story around that person or experience - making them the hero.

Step 3. Apply that to yourself.
Use a simple line such as: "And as we work together you can count on me to operate with integrity because that is how my parents raised me. "

I was coaching a financial advisor named Walker. As he went through this formula he developed a story that sounded like this:

A few months into my first job out of college our employer took us to an extreme team building experience. It was amazing. We were divided into platoons (teams) and each platoon was led by a former Navy Seal. Our leader was a mountain of a man that looked the part of a Navy Seal. The first thing he said to us was this: "If we are going to win, we are going to win as a team. Which means everyone here needs to commit to this - You are going to do the right thing even when nobody is watching. You have to make decisions for the team and not just for yourself. If we can commit to this, there is no stopping us."
I share that with you because this concept resonated with me and it is a commitment I have tried to live by as I do business. So, as we work together I want you to know that you can count on me doing the right thing even when nobody is watching. I am in it so we both win.

This simple formula allows you to build a specific story that we can each use in the influence process. It will allow us to sell ourselves without bragging and win business through The Power of Storytelling.

 

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Change is Inevitable, Adaptability is Essential by Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Jan 21, 2022 | Comments Off

The new normal seems to be a never-ending, changing target and so we have to learn to be flexible.”

There has never been a point in time where adaptability - the ability to deal with change - has been more essential.

The new normal seems to be a never-ending, changing target and so we have to learn to be flexible.

But why is change so hard?

One word - fear.

Change triggers a fear of loss. Giving up what we know, what we enjoy and what is comfortable.

What happens in our mind when we face the unknown is we ask, what if? And our mind tends to answer with a worst-case scenario response.

Our minds are actually trying to protect us and so it helps us to see what we need to avoid but it creates a fear that isn’t necessarily real and, more importantly, it is debilitating.

The problem with fear is it stops us from taking action and effective change requires action.

So, when we play the What If Game in our mind, we have to consciously and strategically answer with a positive response.
We need to see that change leads to growth, new and better results. And use that vision to take action toward creating that reality.

Managing fear is a very real thing for each of us and our teams.
To navigate the constantly changing landscape, we need to be action oriented and understand how to push past fear.

Adaptability is an essential skill in today’s world and it operates much like a muscle. It grows with use.

Managing fear is the first step. Then with consistent action, we grow our adaptability muscle.

 

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The Commitment Scale by Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Sep 21, 2021 | Comments Off


The key to growth, high performance and real impact is commitment.


As a young entrepreneur I had a mentor who used to tell me, “If you treat your business casually, you will become a casualty of your business.”

This advice has stuck with me for nearly 20 years and with time I have found it to be applicable in many areas beyond business.

If you treat your health casually, you will become a casualty.

If you treat your personal and professional growth casually, you will become a casualty.

If you treat your marriage casually, you will become a casualty.

If you treat parenting casually, then your kids will become a casualty.

The key to growth, high performance and real impact is commitment.

True commitment opens doors, gains followers and extends positive influence.

The Commitment Scale asks us to assess where we are living.
At a level of distraction? Constantly being pulled away by every distraction.

At a level of decision? Making a decision plants your flag. It cuts off other options and gives you direction.

At a level of discipline? Where we follow through and choose consistency.

At a level of devotion? Where you are driven by purpose. Where you don’t treat things casually, you are fully committed.

It is devotion that builds brands, loyal followers, committed teams and leaves a legacy.

Don’t be casual.

 

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The Recipe for Motivation by Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Aug 25, 2021 | Comments Off


For you, as the leader, ability is the variable that you can influence the most, and the easiest. You can actively help others gain skills by providing mentoring, training, and education.

As leaders, we spend significant time and resources to motivate our teams. Most of this effort is focused on extrinsic motivation. Extrinsic motivation is the proverbial carrot and stick. Behavior is driven by the promise of a reward, or the fear of retribution. It is effective because it taps into our biological survival system.

Our survival systems relentlessly seek well-being and safety. When that survival system sees the carrot, it craves that reward and promotes thoughts and emotions that drive us to reach for that carrot. In contrast, when the survival system sees (or feels) the stick, it views the pain as a threat to well-being and safety and will go to great lengths to avoid that stick. Extrinsic motivation works—but it has limitations.

Intrinsic motivation, on the other hand, originates within us. It is internal and is not motivated by an external (carrot and stick) factor. One of the best research evaluations of intrinsic motivation was established in the Self Determination Theory. Edward Deci of Rochester University and Richard Ryan of Australian Catholic University originated this theory during the 1970s.

The theory argues that the most voluntary and high-quality motivation were dictated by conditions that support our people's Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness. As leaders, we may not be able to control certain things, but we can influence conditions. We have the ability to provide the right conditions that will promote this high-quality, voluntary motivation. In other words, we can provide conditions that promote intrinsic motivation. In doing this, we can help to create the outcome we are looking for in those we lead.

Because of this research, we as leaders have been given an equation, a formula, a recipe if you will, to create high-quality, voluntary motivation—the type of motivation that drives your people to perform at their highest level.

The ingredients in that recipe are Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness. In the Leader of Leaders Model, we argue that all three are essential, but Competency carries particular importance.

COMPETENCY EXPLAINED

Competency is that sweet spot where ability, experience, and confidence come together. To put it more simply:

ABILITY+EXPERIENCE+CONFIDENCE=COMPETENCE.

As leaders, we tend to focus primarily on ability when evaluating a learner. Ability, by itself, is simply to possess the skills and abilities to do something. However, skills alone do not produce a desired or successful outcome. Instead, desired outcomes require a learner to have the wisdom to apply skills effectively and efficiently. That wisdom comes through experience and confidence. This is why it is rare for a freshman or rookie athlete to make a gigantic impact on the field or on the court. Because although they possess great ability, they lack game experience and confidence to perform at this new level. Competency requires all three components.

COMPETENCY FROM THE LEARNERS PERSPECTIVE

Of the three competence pieces, confidence is the most important from the perspective of the learner. Generally speaking, we as humans tend to dismiss the validity and breadth of our own experience. As our best and often worst critics, we also undervalue our skills. Because of this fatal human flaw, it takes a lot of effort for a learner to build their confidence.

It’s important to remember that our natural tendencies to be biased toward a negative view of ourselves is not our fault. It is all based in our biology. When our survival system perceives a threat to safety or well-being, such as a challenging work assignment, it sends warning signals, usually in the form of fear or anxiety. It perceives the work assignment as a threat—meaning if we do not complete it successfully, our job will be in jeopardy.

If we are unable to manage those thoughts and feelings with confident self-assurance, we do not embrace the work assignment and underperform—despite our ability and experience. We have no control over the thoughts and feelings that come from this survival system. However, we can manage those thoughts and feelings as they enter our consciousness.

Confidence enables us to manage these thoughts and feelings as they surface. Learners who have this confidence will have greater success in their lives and in their work. With confidence, they are able to more effectively and efficiently use their ability and experience to propel themselves forward, rather than succumb to their own self-doubt.

COMPETENCY FROM THE LEADERS PERSPECTIVE

For you, as the leader, ability is the variable that you can influence the most, and the easiest. You can actively help others gain skills by providing mentoring, training, and education. It's not that you have zero influence on experience or confidence, but you have significantly more influence over ability.

Leaders value competency for good reasons. In a ten year study conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the number one contributor to employee satisfaction was the capacity to use skills and abilities. In other words, an employee’s ability to be competent at what they do is what made them happy in their work. Not only does competence produce tremendous motivation, it also creates high satisfaction. It is a double win for both the leader and the learner.

 

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How to Win with People with the Rule of Two by Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Jul 22, 2021 | Comments Off


One of the most useful and practical strategies I teach leaders and salespeople to win with people is The Rule of Two. 

I was speaking for Anthem Insurance in California and at one of the breaks a salesman named Joe asked if he could share an insight with me. Earlier that day, I’d taught about focusing on being interested, not interesting, and he said it reminded him of a rule he made for himself years ago called The Rule of Two.

Joe told me how he was called out early in his career for one-upping other people. It was affecting how he connected (or didn’t connect) with others and it was undermining the influence he was trying to build. Joe decided to fix it and so he developed The Rule of Two. When someone says something about themselves, ask at least two questions before you say anything about yourself.

As an example: your good friend says they like boating – they just bought an expensive boat and they go every weekend to the lake. You may be thinking, “What a bragger, oh really, well I...” But then you stop yourself and remember The Rule of Two. you respond: “I bet your family really enjoys that. How did you decide on the right boat for the family? And what was your favorite family moment at the lake this year?”

Wow, how that changed everything! You felt great about being truly interested in your friend — your friend stopped his normal chatter and thought a minute about what was truly important about the boat and shared with you a personal moment with his family and experience. You made a connection that will not be forgotten, that could have been missed without using The Rule of Two.

Now think about doing that as a leader. Would you build stronger, long-lasting relationships by actually listening and responding from a place of interest? The next time you are heading down the road of one-upping, give Joe’s idea a try. Use the principle of The Rule of Two! 

 

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The Best Advice Stephen Covey Ever Gave by Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Jun 21, 2021 | Comments Off

It’s not about you - it’s about them!

What Is the best advice you have ever received?

Was it a coach telling you, “When you quit, you fail.”
Or maybe it was a friend who said, “It’s ok to say no.”
Or perhaps it was your Mom who told you to wear clean underwear.

In any case, advice from the right person at the right time can often change our perspective.

That is what happened to me the first time I met Dr. Stephen Covey.

The advice he gave me at first seemed specific but I have found it to be more general and has shaped my mindset.

When Stephen Covey found out I was writing a book he told me “Make sure you write the book for the reader, not the writer.”

Let that soak in.

It’s great advice for a writer and I have thought about it often as I have written my four books.

But the thought has more application when you think about it as a mindset.

It’s not about you - it’s about them!
The focus of an influencer is always on the audience.

If you are in sales – it’s about your customer or prospect.

If you are a leader – it’s about the people you are leading.

If you are a teacher – it’s about your students.

If you are a parent – it’s about your children

If you are a speakers - it's about the people listening to you

Almost everyone has this backwards. They think being influential means they need to become polished or powerful. Influence, though, is all about the audience. Be it an audience of one or one thousand. When it’s about them, they get it, and we grow in their eyes.

By thinking out instead of in, by concentrating on others instead of on us, a tremendous transformation takes place. We go from inner-directed to outer- directed, from taker to giver, from self-centered to others-focused, from tight-fisted to generous, from short-sighted to farsighted, from selfish to selfless. We begin to see and act on behalf of others' needs ahead of our own; our thoughts are in terms of "we" instead of "me."

That’s what Stephen Covey taught me with what seemed to be a simple piece of advice. “Make sure you write the book for the reader, not the writer."

 

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Embracing Failure - Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | May 07, 2021 | Comments Off

"Ninja is the perfect metaphor for Success."

I think most people see success as one direction and failure in the exact opposite direction but I don’t think that is true. 

My experience has taught me that you have to pass through failure to find success. In other words, they are the same path. 

The problem is that failure stops us and so we don’t get far enough down the path. 

Successful people learn to embrace failure, learn from it, and use it as fuel. 

Sarah Blakely, the founder of Spanx, is someone who understands this mindset. When Sarah was growing up, her family would have family dinner every night. But unlike most families, their discussions weren’t just about the events of the day or how school went. Sarah’s father every night at dinner would ask the family, “How did you fail today?” 

That question spurred their conversation and they would share their failures. They would discuss what they learned. How it felt. I’m sure they would laugh with each other and sometimes cry together. 

I find it fascinating though, that the youngest self-made female billionaire in the world learned at a young age to embrace failure.

I don’t think it is a coincidence. 

I think that a mindset that embraces failure and uses it as a stepping stone allows us to move further down the path to reach the success we are seeking. 

 

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Ty Bennett - Devotion or Discipline

By Ty Bennett | Nov 16, 2020 | Comments Off

It's not enough to be busy. We're all busy. It's about being productive. We want to focus our attention on getting results. But as great as discipline is, it's not enough. 

 

HubSpot Video

 

What we have to do is move to level four devotion. Now I have a lot of people say, "Ty, but discipline! That's what we're after. Discipline is great, but devotion is better. Luciano Pavarotti, the great tenor, said something really interesting. He said, "Most people think I'm disciplined. I'm not," He said, "I'm devoted. And there's a huge difference."

You see, when you're devoted, you will push through any obstacle. When you're devoted, you're not interested. You're not doing what's convenient. You're committed when you're devoted to a cause. You start to get the attention of other people, they see it in you, and they flock to you. They migrate to you. These are the kind of people that you want to be around, people who have a purpose, who are devoted. They are focused on what it is that they're going to do.

Have you been around people like this? Devotion changes everything. I had a mentor who used to say that successful entrepreneurs compress more activity into tighter timeframes at critical junctures in their business life. Have you seen that? Have you seen people who have come in and built a business quickly who have created this huge storm of activity because of their level of commitment and devotion? People seem to be magnets like magnetic people are drawn to them?

If I can attribute my success to anything, it's learning on that Russian train and being devoted to what I wanted to do. That's what allowed my brother and me to go and build the business that we made. That's what allowed me to go and speak on stages all over the world. That's what has allowed me to write and create three best-selling books. Its devotion, its commitment, its focus.

 

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Fear, Failure, Focus: Ninja Warrior Mindset from Keynote Speaker Ty Bennett

By Ty Bennett | Aug 12, 2020 | Comments Off

Read an excerpt from Ty's newest keynote topic Fear, Failure, Focus: The Ninja Warrior Mindset:

Let's think about fear for just a minute. I think fundamentally, there are three main things that we fear. First we fear loss. We fear giving up something. We fear change. This is why we resist change so much and why we’re worried about what we're going to lose. Our mind plays this game that's a “what if” and if your mind starts to play, it automatically puts a negative thought in there. Our job is to switch that “what if” to a positive and so you have to focus on what you are going to gain and not what you are going to lose.

The second thing that we fear is the process, we fear the unknown and we resist something that's new because it's hard. We don't feel competent and or confident in that new idea, new system, new skill that we have to develop. But psychology teaches us that there's a cycle. It's called the competence confidence loop. What happens is, as you start something new, when you start to build competence, that automatically increases your confidence, which automatically increases your competence. And it just keeps going on and on. 

The third thing that we fear is the result. We worry that it's not going to work out or that we are going to fail. Or maybe we're going to go down this road and it's not going to be what we hoped for. 

So here's a couple ideas on how you can manage your fear:

  • First idea is to write it down. If you write it down, if you vocalize it, if you give voice to what it is that you fear, there's something cathartic about that process. 
  • Number two is to approach fear with curiosity. Ask questions, try and dissect it, try and understand it. Because when you can understand the fear where it's coming from and what it's telling you, then you can logically deal with it without the emotion. 
  • Number three, sometimes you just have to act. Sometimes you just have to have a couple of seconds of insane courage to move forward. What I found is that every successful entrepreneur, every successful Ninja, they value courage.

Keep watching for a full keynote description coming soon!

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Storytelling in times of struggle

By Ty Bennett | Mar 26, 2020 | Comments Off

Right now, the world has been turned upside down. Your industry has most likely been impacted as mine has. Many are confused, some are paralyzed because of fear and others are pivoting to the new normal.

In this time of change, one of the most important skill sets for leaders and influencers to develop and employ, is the skill of storytelling.

HubSpot Video

Stories help us make sense of situations. They paint a picture and cast a vision. Neurologist Paul Zak at Loma Linda University found that stories increase levels of Cortisol and Oxytocin. Cortisol controls focus and attention. Oxytocin, often called the trust hormone, increases empathy and emotion. So stories cause the listener to focus and emotionally connect to the message.

Gary Vaynerchuck said, “Storytelling is by far the most underrated skill in business.” And while I believe that is true in normal conditions, it becomes an absolute truth in times of challenge and change.

I have taught leaders for years that an influential story follows a model of 'struggle to solution'. You engage people with the struggle and then you help them with the solution. This model works because when the struggle is relatable then the solution becomes credible.

But here is what leaders need to understand about this model. 

When we are sharing stories that cast a vision about the future - the solution is not positional - it is directional. Meaning we don’t have to have arrived there to present with confidence. We need to present clearly articulated struggles so that our people understand that we get it and relate. Then with confidence, we need to cast a vision of the direction we need to go to arrive at the desired solution.

The right 'struggle to solution' story may be exactly what is needed at this time of turmoil. There is a power in storytelling when it is developed as a skill and employed as a tool to engage and inspire your people. 

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