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How to Survive the Great Resignation by Tim Sanders

By Tim Sanders | Sep 27, 2021 | Comments Off

 

Nine out of 10 people are currently in consideration of a job change. 51% of them are doing something about it, researching, posting their resume, talking to their friends and colleagues..

Tim Sanders shares how important it is that leaders move "upstream" in their mitigation efforts towards retaining their talented employees by being strategic, not reactive. Get the market edge by being proactive in your strategy to support your people - your business success depends upon it. 

 

VIDEO TRANSLATION
Starting in 2018, researchers begin to call for War For Talent, part two, pointing to an ever-tightening full-time job market in categories ranging from technology to marketing, creative design, analytics, and all forms of knowledge work.

And, then in the spring of 2020, here comes the COVID pandemic, which ushered in a wave of burnout over the coming months. And today, we have a crisis bubbling up between workers and leaders — it's a conflict about whether you continue to work at home, or you have to go in to the “risk” environment of the office. Millions will leave for that reason alone.

And then, there's been a paradigm shift for so many who now consider the importance of life versus the importance of the job at hand. That's why in May of this year, economists started to call for the Great Resignation — a wave of millions of people leaving their current jobs.

Now, I've reviewed these numbers, so consider this. Nine out of 10 people are currently in consideration of a job change. 51% of them are doing something about it, researching, posting their resume, talking to their friends and colleagues. The most conservative prediction I've seen suggests that 25% of workers will job leap in 2022.

Recent research at Upwork also finds that 10 million people that are leaving the full-time workforce are considering never coming back, choosing instead the flexibility of becoming a freelancer. As one executive recently quipped, "The skills gap is turning into a skills canyon." Now what does this mean to you?

Well, if they're not already, your managers are going to be drowning in digital transformation or business growth debt, where they cannot resource the work as requirements pile up. Customer service backlogs will drag down your reputation, projects will run late or never get launched, programs will get cancelled, and for so many companies, business will grind to a halt.

But, those companies that think "upstream," putting a prevention in place for this discontinuity — they will gain a market edge over those that don't for years to come. Just consider the case of information technology — CIO Dive documents that your managers are losing 3 to 9 hours every week trying to use talent acquisition, or antiquated staffing solutions to fill their skills gaps.

I think that the difference between thinking tactical and thinking strategic comes down to which end of the stream you're looking at. If you think prevention, solving a problem before it happens, you're thinking "upstream" and that’s strategic.

If you're reactive, that's thinking "downstream" — for your company, that's an incredible risk.

 

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Leaders Must Build Talent Clouds Now by Tim Sanders

By Tim Sanders | Aug 02, 2021 | Comments Off

The freelance economy has grown since the pandemic of the last year. Tim Sanders, VP of Customer Insights at Upwork and New York Times bestselling author, shares  how the hybrid freelance workforce is going to accelerate even more in the future, and why.

Tim speaks to the enterprise trends at Upwork, one of the largest worldwide staffing companies, that organizations of all sizes are feeling much more comfortable at working with freelance talent. He says that according to their December Future Workforce Report, research shows that there is a significant correlation between a manager’s comfort with remote work and their comfort with leveraging freelancers.

 

As a result, many organizations have started to leverage places like Upwork, more than ever, to help grow their business and scale up during a time of uncertainty.

 

Freelance benefits for projects include:

 

  • Get the work done fast
  • Contain costs
  • Most importantly, bring specialization to a project and improve project outcomes:
    • Rather then re-skilling a current employee, bringing in a freelance worker can infuse a project environment with their specific expertise, saving money and time.

Tim says that he and his group anticipate that leaders and businesses will use freelance talent even more moving forward — he predicts that things will not go back to the way they were before. Much like the acceleration of the hybrid workplace, he believes we will see a trend where the hybrid workforce accelerates in its adoption of the human cloud. More importantly, leaders will put their independent talent at the heart of their businesses, as opposed to them just being on the edges in the gig-work model.

 

What are the major challenges from marketplaces, such as Upwork, to cater to the huge demand?

 

Tim says that at Upwork their #1 requirement from freelancers is that they are full-time, expert professionals, often operating their own stable businesses. Leaders and companies are looking for talent clouds, usually around centers of excellence like marketing, technology and customer success and need specialized professionals who will be available for freelance services for the long-term.

 

Upwork has to ensure that their workers offer the following:

 

  • Commitment to their business, professionalism
  • A portfolio or a demonstrated body of work
  • Increasingly moving forward
  • Have certifications
  • Use assessments as needed

 

Companies consistently ask how they can be sure that freelance workers are onboarded very quickly so they are generating positive outcomes in a relatively short amount of time.

 

Tim shares that they are developing some key ways to ensure businesses have faster onboarding, with the following:

 

Having a Project Manager Upworker:

  • Develops company templates for other freelancers
  • Offers company-specific knowledge and values
  • Assists other freelancers to onboard more quickly with companies
Building Integrated Freelance Teams:

  • They specialize in one part of a project process
    • One example is a mobile software development team
  • The team offers a “soup-to-nuts” solution for a client
  • They are a virtual team and can be much more affordable because they have much less overhead

Tim shares that, as the world continues to grow its freelancing community, the time is now for organizations to start building their own virtual talent cloud of leader, specialists and contributors. Specialized freelance workers will be hired quickly over these next few years and leaders will want to be sure they secure the top tier freelancers to augment their projects going forward.

 

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