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Set Bold Goals - Write Music You Can't Play

By Mike Rayburn | Jan 15, 2020 | Comments Off

 

Setting Bold Goals

The way I use the question “What if”  is to think outside the box and set goals that are crazy. I call it write music that you can't play. Set goals for yourself where you don't know how, but you know what. Don't start with what's possible. Start with: what's cool, what's right. 

When you have a goal like this, from my experience of goal setting, three things are going to happen:

#1: When you set this goal, you'll have a completion date, and you probably won't make it. We usually don't make it in time. Why? You've never done it before. This is a new thing. So you're setting out to do something that's not been done and you don't know how long it'll take. Be ready for it to change. 

#2: When you get back home and you start to act on your new goal, you will have a plan in the beginning and it will not go according to your plan. You have to have the plan in the beginning but it's going to change. You have to be flexible

#3: I want you to remember this for the day you get back at work. To do things you have never done, you have to start by doing things you've never done.

One of the boldest goals I ever set for myself was to learn how to play Bohemian Rhapsody on the guitar. It took a lot of work and accepting these three things as they happen.

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How to Introduce a Keynote Speaker

By Karen Harris | Jan 14, 2020 | Comments Off

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The person introducing a keynote speaker gets the audience's attention and sets the tone for the talk and for the experience. To make the most of your presentation of presenters – I thought I’d share a few industry tips.

  1. Prepare. Be sure to meet with your keynote speaker well before they take the stage to get their introduction, any guidance on their preferences, and definitely the correct pronunciation of their name! (I can’t tell you how often I’ve seen that go sideways!) Most keynoters are professionals with enough experience behind them, they’ll have some ideas on best practices for their particular topic. 
  2. Practice. Even the most experienced keynote speakers practice and rehearse before they take the stage, so should you. Take some time to rehearse your introduction and cadence before you take the microphone. 
  3. Let your confidence come to the surface. Your team or organization has made a great decision to bring a professional keynote speaker to the audience. Bring a confidence to your delivery style as you help the audience welcome both speaker, and the message they are about to convey. 
  4. Brevity is your friend. The best introduction are short and sweet. They deliver enough about the keynote speaker to provide authority and context without losing interest. It’s an intro, not a novel! 
  5. Tee up the topic. Tease your audience with a little bit of what they are about to hear and why the topic is so important to them, and to your organization. 

A successful speech is “all in the delivery” as they say. Be thoughtful, be yourself, and be prepared and you’ll do just fine! If you want to learn more tips and tools for your next event or how to hire the best keynote speaker possible for your organization, give me a call. We specialize in bringing remarkable speakers together with clients from all over the globe. We’d love to be of service!

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Do your people feel heard?

By Ty Bennett | Jan 08, 2020 | Comments Off

 

Our world has changed psychologically, and specifically because of social media. What do I mean by that? Go back with me twenty years ago, before social media existed. There was a cultural understanding that if you were sitting in a room and you did not hold a position of leadership, you did not have a say. Generally, we were okay with that. We understood that. It's just how the world worked. But today, that's not how people think. 

Everyone, especially the younger workforce, because of social media, has a voice and a platform for that voice. They're used to being heard and therefore they think they should be heard. If you hire an eighteen-year old intern today they think they have a say tomorrow. You might not agree with that. You might even think that's really stupid. 

That's the problem. 

People support what they help create

We want people to be committed at the point of implementation. If you think that commitment happens to the point of implementation, you're missing the boat. Commitment actually happens at the point of creation. People need to be involved. They need a sense of ownership. The pushback I get from leaders is that it takes too long. I agree with you. It does take a long time. 

I'm not saying that in your organization, every single person needs to be involved in every decision that is made. But what I am asking you is, do your people feel heard? Do they feel like they have a voice? Do they feel like they have a say?

I’ve heard leaders say they want people who have independent thinking, I agree with that. But if that independent thinking is never listened-to or acted upon, that stifles that independent thinking pretty quickly. People support what they help create. We have to create buy-in by engaging and involving our people. The best leaders understand how to do that.

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