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CMI Blog

the latest from cmi speaker managment

relationships

Resonating Voices in an Often-Chaotic World

By Karen Harris | Sep 19, 2018 | Comments Off

How Keynoters are Making a Difference

Our world is noisy, chaotic, frustrating, even fearful for many. I believe that is why organizations of every conceivable size are stepping up to bring people together to hear empowering messages from today’s keynote speakers. The kind of messages that move people to take action in their lives, to find balance, to believe in the power of relationships, to feel hope – and to adopt change as the necessary ingredient of success that it is. These speakers are working for way more than an ovation – they are “turning on the lightbulbs” for audiences who often feel like there’s too much darkness.

It’s exciting when they connect. When an audience member internalizes a message that anything’s possible in a time where many are feeling as if their heads are bumping against glass ceilings.  When you’re in the room with a world-class speaker – whether they are speaking to 50 or 1,000 - you can feel the change occur. When what’s raging in the news media or outside the conference venue seems fractional compared to the growth and mindset shifts you witness taking place in the room. People are laughing – and they’re learning. People are on the edge of their seat and eager for more. That’s the difference words from the right people at the right time can make.

From keynote speakers who can move leaders to become more accountable and provide a culture where creativity and collaboration can flourish, to speakers who share how we are more alike as human beings than we are different and speak on the power of diversity, global citizenship, and every kind of speaker in between – these voices are resonating with today’s audiences. People need return on investment – and they need real-world solutions. They need productivity propellers – and they also need to laugh out loud. They need to see the big picture, at the same time recognizing how very much little things matter.

Working with speakers who have the immense talent to move people from where they are to where they want and need to be is a passion of every member of our team. We recognize the tremendous work they do to elevate audience experiences – and deliver take-aways that can literally change the lives and careers of others. In a world with a whole lot of noise, it’s exceptional to sit in an audience so silent and captivated by a speaker there’s almost an electricity in the room – this is why we do what we do. We know helping our speakers share their vision, missions, and messages changes the world for the better. We’re pretty darn proud of that. To all the speakers and clients we work with daily to deliver success strategies, leadership, sales, service, humor, and so much more – a nod of thanks for allowing us to be part of the process.

Learn more about Karen and the cmi team!

Psychology of Customer Relations | Ty Bennett

By Dori Pominville | Aug 14, 2018 | Comments Off

In this powerful and insightful presentation, Ty Bennett expertly breaks down the psychology behind customer service and your organization’s growth and retention. From every level of leadership to every level of your team, the culture and communication you foster equate either to customer relationships for life – or a revolving door. Either high volume, high retention – or low productivity and the high cost of new customer acquisition. With practical strategies, Ty helps your team create a customer loyalty that will rival the best of competitors.

In this game-changing keynote Ty will share how to:

  • Develop customer loyalty at a high level
  • Drive referrals through increased connectivity
  • Build long-lasting relationships
  • Fuel customer acquisition and retention

In today’s world, excellence in service is the difference between status quo and top of the competitive ladder. Customer expectations are at an all-time high – and their tolerance at an all-time low. Invite Ty Bennett to share the skills, strategies, and psychology that will bring growth-producing results for your organization.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HiBT-jtx4PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9st3TcHel98

Learn more about Ty Bennett and his topics here.

What are three ways you irritate your customers? - Mike Rayburn

By Dori Pominville | Feb 27, 2018 | Comments Off

I was asked this question by my friend and mentor, Dr. Nido Qubein, and it has begun to transform my business.

I have changed my fee structure, my client communications, and more is coming, all because I answered this question.

No one ever asked me so I’m now asking again…Read the full post here.

Don’t Hold People Accountable! - Sam Silverstein

By cmiadmin | Jan 20, 2017 | Comments Off

All to often we hear someone say, “You have to hold them accountable.” Or we hear a leader say, “I’m going to hold you accountable.” The truth is that it should never be about holding people accountable. We, as leaders, should be helping people be accountable. There is a big difference between the two.

Accountability is keeping your commitments to people. A commitment takes two people. When you are helping someone be accountable both parties benefit. When you hold someone accountable it’s one-sided. There is a huge difference between these two positions. The end result is different.

“Hold” is an aggressive stand. It’s an in your face position. It’s threatening. And, it’s about you. It is not about them.

When you help someone be accountable they become better in the process. It’s not just about the result. When you help someone be accountable you get a result, but through the experience the person grows.

You can’t help someone be accountable when the values aren’t stated so you default to holding them accountable. Then it’s not about the relationship. It’s not about helping them grow. It’s only about your immediate need and gain. It’s only about the task at hand and that is why it is not long-lasting.

When you help someone, they remember it, and they want to help you. It is positive, contributes to relationships and has long-term positive outflows.

Helping people be accountable helps them grow to learn how to be accountable, want to be accountable and the end result is long-lasting.

When you hold someone, they also remember it, but it is negative and the long-term effect is negative both in the relationship and the desire to help you.

Holding is short-term. Helping is long-term.

Helping someone be accountable starts with a focus on them. The leader has to know the values and the leader needs to teach the values to the people they lead. If you don’t know the values or the values are not identified you cannot help anyone be accountable.

When you care about the person you’re leading you are going to coach them. You want to see them grow to be the best they can be. It really becomes a mindset. It is a way of thinking.

But, it is a 2-way street. I have to want to help you be accountable. You have to be open to be helped to be accountable. This flows from an environment. It’s the leaders responsibility to create this environment.

Helping people be accountable will always position you and your organization for long-term relationship building, long-term development of people and long-term success.

More from Sam Silverstein!

EOFire Podcast Interview with Tim Sanders

By cmiadmin | Dec 09, 2016 | Comments Off

According to Tim, “People and innovative business relationships are the next big thing.” This former Yahoo executive has launched companies, built brands and now runs a media services company specializing in business trends, new media and human behavior. He is the author of Love Is the Killer App, The Likeability Factor, Today We Are Rich, and Dealstorming. He’s passionate about the power of great relationships....

Click here to listen to the podcast interview!

Behind the Scenes of Vinh's American Trip

By cmiadmin | Sep 29, 2016 | Comments Off

Get a behind the scenes look at Vinh's American speaking trip!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOYbIUFXCj8

More From Vinh Giang

It's Not About You - Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Sep 20, 2016 | Comments Off

9-20-1-300x206It’s not about you – it’s about them!
The focus of an influencer is always on the audience.
If you are a speaker – it’s about the people listening to you.
If you are in sales – it’s about your customer or prospect.
If you are a leader – it’s about the people you are leading.
If you are a teacher – it’s about your students.
If you are a parent – it’s about your children

Almost everyone has this backwards. They think being influential means they need to become polished or powerful. Influence, though, is all about the audience. Be it an audience of one or one thousand. When it’s about them, they get it, and we grow in their eyes.

By thinking out instead of in, by concentrating on others instead of on us, a tremendous transformation takes place. We go from inner directed to outer directed, from taker to giver, from self-centered to others-focused, from tightfisted to generous, from shortsighted to farsighted, from selfish to selfless. We begin to see and act on behalf of others’ needs ahead of our own; our thoughts are in terms of “we” instead of “me.”

See More from Ty!

People Do Business With People They Know, Like, Trust and Value - Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Sep 19, 2016 | Comments Off

Ty Bennett Promo Video ShotThere’s a fundamental rule of business that states: “People do business with people they know, like and trust.” We’ve all heard that, and even repeated it, but ultimately it is wrong.

Ok, maybe wrong is not the right word. But the rule is incomplete. The truth is, people do business with people they know, like, trust and VALUE.

Honesty and likeability are important, but if people don’t see you as valuable, they will never do business with you. If you don’t come across as professional, knowledgeable, and credible with the right skill set to get the job done, you will never be as influential and successful as you would like.

So what do we do about it? How do we make ourselves more valuable? By constantly developing our knowledge, our skills and continually striving to get better. The fundamental rule of Business should read: “People do business
with people they know, like, trust and value”

Reputation is your track record. It is confidence in character and capability over time. Henry Ford said, “You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do,” so reputation only comes after you make the investment. Lasting influence is built and sustained by reputation. People can be influential in a given situation, or for a temporary period of time, but lasting influence is based in reputation. That is why it is so important to guard your reputation, cultivate your reputation, and be a person of character and ever-increasing capability.

See More from Ty!

High Touch Service for a High Tech World - Tim Sanders

By cmiadmin | Jul 14, 2016 | Comments Off

High Touch Service for a High Tech World - Tim Sanders

My neighbor Brian describes his bi-monthly meetings with his financial advisor, Ken, as “an oasis of conversation in a world of bite-sized thoughts.” Sometimes they discuss financial planning and other times they talk about current events. Over the last decade, Brian has embraced the digital information revolution, replacing store visits with Amazon.com sessions and finding many of his services online. His real estate broker, accountant and attorney communicate more over email these days than face to face. While digital technology is convenient, it lacks the human touch, especially when he has questions or customer service issues.

“Ken’s a throwback, that’s for sure,” he told me. “And I consider him an indispensible part of my life.” While Ken may be conducting analog business in a digital world, he’s also finding a way to stand out from a sea of financial planning services.

In 1995, MIT Media Lab founder Nicholas Negroponte declared, “That which can be digitized will be digitized.” Needless to say, he was right and here we are. But is it all for the better?

Several years ago, I partnered with the HeartMath Institute to survey thousands of people about their Internet use, quality of life and state of mind. The results were unsettling. We found that a high percentage of our respondents suffered from too much information and too little human interaction in the real world. The result was a condition we coined New Economy Depression Syndrome (NEDS). Complications include loss of sleep, anxiety and stress. Since then, Internet usage has skyrocketed due to mobile devices and pervasive WiFi availability.

Not only do consumers gravitate toward all things digital, but service providers are also seeking the efficiency of machine learning, bot-based service and automation to disrupt financial services. These “FinTech” innovations purport to be ushering in a golden era of convenience and consumer empowerment. But really, they increase the divide between people like Brian and Ken.

…the move to digital services likely creates an atmosphere of confusion and misunderstanding.

Financial services professionals have fallen prey to the allure of digital tools like email to extend their capabilities and save time. In 2012, Deeper Media polled financial advisors to measure their mix of communications with their clients (breaking it out into meetings, phone, email and text). Not surprisingly, email represented over half of all communications. Face-to-face meetings with clients were down, in some cases by half, due to increased workloads that advisors faced.

The problem with email is that it fails to communicate our intentions and convey any level of nuance. UC Berkeley professor Albert Mehrabian and his research team found that nothing creates clarity like one’s ability to see facial expressions and hear tone of voice. In other words, the move to digital services likely creates an atmosphere of confusion and misunderstanding. While email works for simple transactions like sending reports and updates, it’s no replacement for real-time or face-to-face conversations.

All of this presents an opportunity for financial advisors who w ant to break the digital chain and differentiate through high-touch services. Here are four ways to keep human-to-human contact front and center with your best clients:

• Warm up the channel whenever possible

Think of each of your communication channels like a cup of coffee. Email is cold, but efficient. Phone calls provide a warmer real-time interaction. Meetings present a piping hot opportunity to make deep connections. Track your interactions with clients, isolating those that need to move from email to phone or phone to in-person.

• Sell meetings and phone calls as high value interactions

One reason clients aren’t receptive to phone calls or meetings is their lack of a strong value proposition. Remember, the consumer seeks efficiency as much as — or more than — you do, so you need to convince them to take the time to talk or meet with you in order to warm up the channel. Don’t schedule vague “check-ins”; instead, offer learning sessions or personal coaching opportunities. When the call or meeting happens, make sure you bring an information gift to every interaction, and deliver a high “return on attention.”

• Listen more than you talk

A great way to build your personal brand of being a great conversational partner is to provide a sounding board to your clients. In The 8th Habit, Dr. Stephen Covey argues that one of our greatest needs in life is to be heard. We don’t want to be alone in our feelings and opinions, so those who listen well become our closest friends and partners. In my experience, I’ve found that if I talk 50 percent less in client meetings, my sales performance rises sharply because I discover more opportunities and, at the same time, produce more trust.

• Be available at the most personal level

The biggest problem with online services is that they are purely transactional. Email or chat conversations are solely focused on resolving the client’s issue as fast as possible. This is where the human touch can really differentiate. Your clients are real people with real problems, and when they reveal them to you in casual conversation, be willing to detour the conversation to the personal. In some cases, all you can do is provide encouragement, but in others, you may be able to offer a solution that goes beyond your product set or financial advice. You are a human being as well. It’s more than likely that your clients share a lot of the same kind of life experiences, and yours could easily influence theirs in a positive way. And in the process, your client comes to like you — and trust you — more than ever. That’s high touch.

Tim Sanders - Dealstorming Bootcamp Offer

By cmiadmin | May 02, 2016 | Comments Off

Tim Sanders - Dealstorming Bootcamp Offer

Tim Sanders Promo-Desktop

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