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CMI Blog

the latest from cmi speaker managment

motivation

Finding Your "In" - Chris Bashinelli

By Dori Pominville | Jul 30, 2018 | Comments Off

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckl4bZ4rK10&t=18s

Learn more about Chris Bashinelli!

Start at Step 'Z' - Chris Bashinelli

By Dori Pominville | Jun 04, 2018 | Comments Off

From moderating a major United Nations event in Brazil at 23 years old with no prior experience, to leading a National Geographic Expedition in Mongolia when nearly all funding had been pulled one month before production, Chris Bashinelli shows how when we change our mind, we can change our world. The key to creating success lies not in getting what we want, but in realizing that we already have everything we need to live a life of great meaning. By connecting our ultimate goal to a mission that benefits others, and having unwavering faith in one’s potential, we will find the inspiration necessary to reach our Step “Z”.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEwSpvB0KDs

What’s Working for Today’s Audiences

By Karen Harris | May 11, 2018 | Comments Off

 

When Humour and How-to’s Come Together

Here’s what we know – our world is a little chaotic right now. Stressful. Fast-paced. Even our best mindfulness experts are busy finding new ways to help organizations keep their staff members focused and steady in the “storms”.

One of the top requests we get from event planning professionals inquiring about our speakers is, “We need an entertaining speaker with a message.” We totally get that. A speaker who entertains, i.e., makes people laugh, is a tremendous equalizer. It’s a way for people to engage with a speaker and a message on a whole new level. Humour breaks down the barriers in communication in ways that other delivery styles can’t. It releases the stress that your audience brings with them from their busy work lives so when they hear the message (whether it be around innovation, leadership or teamwork) their minds are totally open and ready to learn.

We know that putting together events that work, start to finish, is a big job. It’s a juggling act between content and entertainment to ensure attendees get the right mix of skills, strategy, ideas, insights, motivation, and inspiration. Just as with humour, timing is everything.

What works best in our experience is to start your event off with an “entertaining speaker with a message” before you get to your “corporate speak” or “technical talks.” This ensures the attendees’ moods are lifted and their minds are open, so they are ready to receive the heavier material they also need to receive.

There’s a lot in our world to be stressed over, for sure. Finding a talented speaker who can BOTH educate AND entertain is one of the stressors we take away. It makes our day when your event participants give YOU a standing ovation for bringing in the best speaker ever!

Want to learn more? Contact us today to find out how we can help match the perfect speaker, message, and motivation for your next audience.

Karen Harris is the CEO of www.cmispeakers.com and is an expert at helping those who host and plan meetings to source great speakers. cmi is a global meeting industry leader which represents an international roster of carefully selected speakers who positively impact millions of people through their keynote speeches, books, and thought leadership.

Peak Performance Speaker Robyn Benincasa's Motivational Keynote Takeaways

By cmiadmin | Feb 28, 2017 | Comments Off

Let Robyn explain what you can expect to takeaway from her keynotes!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_S7zK3OcsNA

Watch a Demo Video of Robyn's Keynote!

 

5 Things That Help Me Stay Motivated - Vinh Giang

By cmiadmin | Nov 07, 2016 | Comments Off

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7q3-m9nsAs

More from Vinh!

It's Not About You - Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Sep 20, 2016 | Comments Off

9-20-1-300x206It’s not about you – it’s about them!
The focus of an influencer is always on the audience.
If you are a speaker – it’s about the people listening to you.
If you are in sales – it’s about your customer or prospect.
If you are a leader – it’s about the people you are leading.
If you are a teacher – it’s about your students.
If you are a parent – it’s about your children

Almost everyone has this backwards. They think being influential means they need to become polished or powerful. Influence, though, is all about the audience. Be it an audience of one or one thousand. When it’s about them, they get it, and we grow in their eyes.

By thinking out instead of in, by concentrating on others instead of on us, a tremendous transformation takes place. We go from inner directed to outer directed, from taker to giver, from self-centered to others-focused, from tightfisted to generous, from shortsighted to farsighted, from selfish to selfless. We begin to see and act on behalf of others’ needs ahead of our own; our thoughts are in terms of “we” instead of “me.”

See More from Ty!

People Do Business With People They Know, Like, Trust and Value - Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Sep 19, 2016 | Comments Off

Ty Bennett Promo Video ShotThere’s a fundamental rule of business that states: “People do business with people they know, like and trust.” We’ve all heard that, and even repeated it, but ultimately it is wrong.

Ok, maybe wrong is not the right word. But the rule is incomplete. The truth is, people do business with people they know, like, trust and VALUE.

Honesty and likeability are important, but if people don’t see you as valuable, they will never do business with you. If you don’t come across as professional, knowledgeable, and credible with the right skill set to get the job done, you will never be as influential and successful as you would like.

So what do we do about it? How do we make ourselves more valuable? By constantly developing our knowledge, our skills and continually striving to get better. The fundamental rule of Business should read: “People do business
with people they know, like, trust and value”

Reputation is your track record. It is confidence in character and capability over time. Henry Ford said, “You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do,” so reputation only comes after you make the investment. Lasting influence is built and sustained by reputation. People can be influential in a given situation, or for a temporary period of time, but lasting influence is based in reputation. That is why it is so important to guard your reputation, cultivate your reputation, and be a person of character and ever-increasing capability.

See More from Ty!

The company with no secrets - Mike Walsh

By cmiadmin | Sep 15, 2016 | Comments Off

Does radical transparency work, or is it just a culture gimmick?


Some of the b1-0sgbkbljrg0x5w39pp28ugiggest sources of stress inside organizations are secrets. When a new boss is appointed, merger talks begin or layoffs are rumored, everyone goes into threat response mode. Personal survival is paramount, and people lose focus and stop creating valuable work.

Some companies are seeking to address this issue by making as much information available as is legally possible. The social media startup Buffer for example, publishes a report every month detailing the growth in its user base, revenue and total cash position. It publishes how much is paid to its workers and how it calculates those numbers. Strangely, rather than deterring employees, this approach has actually led to more job applications.

When I interviewed Brian Halligan, the CEO of Hubspot, he told me the story of how a few years into starting his business he had joined a group of CEOs who met regularly in Boston. At one particular meeting, the topic was culture. Brian had gone to the session thinking that the subject was a complete waste of time, until he sat next to the CEO of iRobot — who was not only brilliant but read him the riot act on culture. That same week, Hubspot surveyed their employees, and discovered that only half of them really liked working there. At that point he and his team decided to study the issue intensely. Their key assumption was that if the way people work and live had changed, the way they led and organized people also had to adapt.

Brian quickly realized that the real issue was transparency. Secrets created politics, especially in fast growing companies. He wanted his employees to trust him, and for him to be able to implicitly trust them too. They started sharing more information. They posted the notes from boardroom meetings on the wiki. They adopted a single policy of “use good judgment”. Employees could submit questions, which would be handled at the company meeting.

In Brian’s words, they had their toughest employees monitor the founders at this session, to make sure that none of them got let off the hook. And yet, ironically enough, it was similar attempts to get off the hook that recently got Hubspot in trouble, their CMO fired, and an FBI investigation triggered by alleged attempts to hush the bestselling book, ‘Disrupted’ by former employee Dan Lyons.

Extreme disclosure is not for everyone, especially when it comes at the price of surveillance. At $150 billion hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, the firm has a policy of taping all meetings. A recent complaint by a former employee described the environment of constant video surveillance as a ‘cauldron of fear and intimidation’. According to the report by the NYT, recordings of controversial meetings were frequently archived and later shown to employees as part of the company’s policy of learning from mistakes.

Secrets can be powerful. They can protect the vulnerable, keep competitors at bay, and safeguard national interests. But they can also breed mistrust and in companies, divert energy from more productive pursuits.

So as you weigh up the design of your own culture — ask yourself, how much time do the people in your business spend worrying about their own survival rather than the survival of your business?

We Have Hit Peak Tech - Mike Walsh

By cmiadmin | May 11, 2016 | Comments Off

We Have Hit Peak Tech - Mike Walsh

Is slow tech just a cynical status update or is it here to save us?


Every year, we are rewarded with a new round of technology upgrades. Faster processors, bigger and brighter screens, better cameras — a bounty that promises more rapid selfies, status updates and streaming entertainments. Forget peak oil, we have hit peak tech. For the more enlightened, that means something needs to change.

One of the highlights of the Further Future event in the desert this year, was Eric Schmidt flying in on his chopper to counsel the Mad Max styled crowd to disconnect from their devices and break their addition to technology. Such advice from a former Google CEO is not as ironic as it might sound. Google themselves, concerned for the welfare of their employees, have run experiments such as Dublin Goes Dark, where staff were asked to leave their phones at reception when they finished for the day, to create a better distinction between work and life. They are not alone. France, the perennial defender of La Bonne Vie, is set to pass a law that will allow workers to ignore their email after 6pm.

Behind all of these experiments and debates, is a bigger question about our relationship to technology. Rather than being slaves to the upgrade cycle, people are now talking about the Slow Tech movement. It was actually one of the subjects I spoke about with French entrepreneur and digital philosopher, Tariq KRIM, during the very first episode of my podcast, Between Worlds.

Some of the biggest adherents to the idea of Slow Tech are, nor surprisingly, concerned parents. Those of us born in the seventies, grew up in the shadow of the apparently corrosive influence of television. TV was our generation’s moral hazard, but at least it was controllable. There was a time for homework, a time for family dinner, and a time for reruns of M.A.S.H. In the smartphone age, such delineations are not so easy to make — unless, like one ambitious cafe, you build your dining room as a Faraday cage.

Your devices are getting faster, but you don’t have to.

And yet in a way, design may actually be the best solution to connectivity overload. Rather than designing for ever increasing speed and throughput, we may actually start to imagine products that come with in-built friction, that are designed to slow us down. Think of it as a kind of stomach band for our tech addiction.

The digital Leica M-D camera, sans the ubiquitous LCD screen.

Here are couple of examples:

  • The new Leica M-D is a gorgeous digital camera without a LCD screen, and manual controls for aperture, shutter speed and ISO. It is designed to re-create both the creative focus, and the anticipation that traditionally came with analog film photography.
  • Apps like IA Writer, and devices like the Freewrite, remove the temptations of modern tablets, to offer writers the same distraction-free environment as an old school typewriter did.
  • The Punkt mobile phone has had all of the features of a hyper-connected smartphone surgically incised, and simply allows the user to text and make calls. As its makers explain, ‘The more our phones do, the more they demand of us’.
  • Vinyl sales are having a mighty resurgence. The warmth of the analog sound is only one of the attractions of the medium. Also appealing is the mindfulness that putting on a record requires, as opposed to the instant gratification of streaming an algorithmic playlist.
  • Long form content platforms like Medium are gaining a wider audience, as readers — tired of 140 character updates or moronic click bait lists — seek more reflective alternatives. Even on mobile.

Some might fairly label Slow Tech products and practices as a Luddite reaction to the inevitable ascent of technology. You can’t stop progress, and it is certainly dangerous to try and regulate it into submission. But as co-creators of the future, it is also foolish to completely abdicate aesthetic control over what technology offers us, and how we wish to live.

A faster future is always possible, but is it desirable?

At the same time, we should resist becoming the grumpy elder who has lost touch with the new generation. Maybe several decades from now, if brain interfaces to technology become commonplace, our kids, now themselves parents, will find themselves bemoaning their own children’s habits.

Do you best to suppress your wry grin as you hear them yelling in the next room, ‘Hey! How many times do I have to tell you to stop doing that? I know you are thinking on the computer again. Use an iPad like a normal person for once!’


If you are interested in more of my ideas, you can stalk me on the Web. I spend 300 days a year travelling: researching markets, interviewing clever people, giving talks and looking for the future in the seeds of the present. Drop me a line if you would like me to speak at your next event.

Follow me on Twitter | Watch my talks | Listen to my podcast

Tim Sanders - Dealstorming Bootcamp Offer

By cmiadmin | May 02, 2016 | Comments Off

Tim Sanders - Dealstorming Bootcamp Offer

Tim Sanders Promo-Desktop

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