<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=474710470599804&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

CMI Blog

the latest from cmi speaker managment

human resources

The 5 Attributes of Today's Leader by Clint Pulver

By Clint Pulver | Apr 19, 2022 | Comments Off

“You’re either the number one reason why people
are staying, or you’re the number one reason why they are leaving.” - Clint Pulver

So often, organizations wonder why their turnover rate is high. But the truth of the matter is, as a leader, you’re either the number one reason your people stay, or you’re
the number one reason why your people are leaving.

Roughly 60% of the employees interviewed by Clint’s Undercover Millennial research program were currently looking for new employment. How do you get your employees to love their job and want to stay and grow with your company?

The diagnosis is with you – the leader.

Employees are not quitting companies—they’re quitting bosses.

The answer to employee turnover is easier than you think and is why Clint Pulver’s keynote and book, “I Love It Here,” are resonating with so many companies and audiences – the diagnosis begins with your leadership.

From the thousands of millennials and younger workers interviewed with the Undercover Millennial program - what they loved or didn’t love about their job - the most prominent answer for being satisfied was that they, “loved their boss.” Although there are many leadership styles Clint has identified from his program, the Mentor-Manager is the top proven way for leaders to engage with their employees.

The top 5 attributes of this style of leadership are:

  • One-on-one coaching, focusing on personal growth
  • Shifting the focus to the employee and their personal and professional goals
  • Helping the employee establish their path, values and purpose—both within the company and outside of it
  • Putting focus on the people within the ship, instead of just where the ship is headed.
  • Standing next to others and walking the path with them.

“Great mentors have the ability to communicate a person’s
potential and worth to the point that the person begins to see it in themselves.”

With this in mind, never underestimate the power of a Mentor
Manager, and your ability to move people—both physically and mentally.

Learn more about why Clint’s message is inspiring and moving people to action, young and old. His years of research, proven application and incredible strategies for engaging employees are at the core of his bestselling book, “I Love It Here,” his Mentor-Management keynote message and his drum experience. You don’t want to miss it! 

Learn more about Clint Pulver

How To Manage When An Employee Is In Crisis by Clint Pulver

By Clint Pulver | Jan 24, 2022 | Comments Off

560x400_Clint-Pulver-Header

1 big idea

When someone on your team is in the middle of a crisis, sometimes it’s all you can see; you get nervous, you waver between hovering and avoidance; you might even feel guilty for worrying about the work.

But here’s something to remember that can help you push past that awkwardness: Your employee is more than their crisis.

2 insights from our workplace research

  • As much as you might wish those thoughts away, it’s natural to have secret worries about errors or schedules when someone on your team is struggling with an awful event. But when employees tell us about the bosses who earned their loyalty in tough times, they talk about the ones who arrive with compassion first.
  • How can you manage that when all you feel is stress? You keep things separate. To your employee, you show care, support, and a listening ear. When you’re with your peers, that’s the time to unload all those concerns about deadlines and dropped balls.

The best managers we’ve met always saw each of their employees as a whole person—especially during a crisis. Whatever they’re going through, make sure it isn’t the subject of every conversation you have. If you used to talk about sports or kids or movies, keep doing that. If work is helping them hold it together, follow their lead and discuss the work, just like before. Treating an employee in crisis like they’re still who they always were can help them feel more like themselves too.

1 moment to master

A great way to stay on track when someone on your team gets sideswiped is to have a plan at the ready. This week, take some time to review the supports your company offers, like paid time off, counselling, loans, or an EAP. Then, get familiar with the terms and what an employee would need to do to access those benefits.

Also, assess your team’s readiness to act as a support network too:

  • Do you have a phone tree or chat group that could quickly raise a meal-delivery or fundraising army?
  • Who could you call on to step in or take on extra duties if needed?
    • Keep privacy in mind: always get permission from the employee before revealing any personal information.
  • Sketch out what your team can do before a crisis hits to help avoid brain lock later, when emotions are high.

 

Clint-Pulver-Undercover-Millenial-Speaker

Why Managers Should Always Be Recruiting by Clint Pulver

By Clint Pulver | Oct 18, 2021 | Comments Off

Who is Clint Pulver? Watch video to learn more about his incredible and inspiring keynote experience that he brings to every company, every audience with irresistible style.

Maybe this has happened to you: your business is unexpectedly short-staffed, so you put out a hasty job posting. It gets shared around online and the résumés flood in. But—catch 22—because you’re overworked, you don’t have time to truly assess those candidates. So, you go through them quickly and settle on the one who seems like the best of the bunch.

It might feel like a relief to check that box, but what you’ve actually done is create a bigger problem down the road. Why? You’ve put the vacancy first, not the hire. The pressure of needing a warm body has led you to get your recruitment priorities backwards, and now you have people on your team who may not fit, may not thrive, and may even be undermining your workforce.

Hey, I get it! Being understaffed can feel like an emergency—everyone is rushed, details are getting missed, no one is happy, and customers might even be walking out the door. But if you skip the work of choosing the right person, you could be taking that temporary state of emergency and turning it into your business as usual.

So here are three words to remember if you don’t want your short-term staffing demands to dictate your long-term success: Always. Be. Recruiting.

4 Strategies Great Companies Use to Actively Recruit

In all of our workplace analysis, the most innovative organizations we’ve come across are proactive. What does that mean? It means they are always looking for good employees. Always! They never let a deadline or vacancy take control of who joins their team—and they don’t let a crisis define who they become.

Remember: recruiting is not hiring. You don’t have to end up managing a team of 1,000 with a payroll for 100. Recruiting is about keeping an eye out for the best people, whether or not you plan to hire anyone in the immediate horizon.

What does that look like in practice? Here are the top four strategies we’ve seen great companies use to identify and attract the workforce they want.

1. Keep a standing invitation on your careers page

Job postings are by nature reactive. Yes, they are a necessary outreach tool, but they aren’t your only tool. Proactive companies keep a permanent notice on their careers page that invites people to get in touch or send in a résumé—and they keep it there whether or not there is an active opening. If a promising person approaches them who looks like they’d be a great fit, they keep in touch, start a conversation, invite them in for a coffee meeting or a tour. And, when a job opening does come up, they take the initiative to reach out and invite them to apply.

2. Build relationships with talented people

The more connected and active you are in your industry, the better the chances that you’ll cross paths with amazing people. Go to industry conferences and events, go to job fairs, look for opportunities to speak about your industry at schools and training institutions. And when you meet someone who could be a good fit for your team someday—whether that’s a young student starting out, an intern, a great contractor, or even a colleague from a different company—don’t let that opportunity pass you by! Keep in touch, make yourself of service, and build a relationship so that you’re top of mind when they’re looking for something new.

3. Maintain a welcoming company culture

If I was a young person interested in your industry and I visited your business, what would I see? How welcoming is your company—your website, your culture, your branding, even your physical space? A welcoming company culture is about more than friendliness: it’s openness, where outsiders feel invited, and can see who you are and how you work. It’s accessibility (in all senses of the word). It’s both diversity and unity. And it’s visibility, through social media, LinkedIn posts, outreach, and online and real-world events.

4. Have an employee referral program

Successful managers understand that their existing employees are their best pipeline for reaching more talent. Like is attracted to like, and people who are smart, talented, educated, curious, empathetic, driven, friendly, or even simply experienced in a given field tend to hang out with others with the same qualities. An in-house referral program that encourages and rewards employees who recommend potential hires will help you tap into the social and professional networks of the employees you already have. And the more great people you bring on, the more great people you’ll have access to.

Challenge: Conduct a Recruiting Audit of Your Company

So how ready is your business to welcome the people you want working for you? This week, take some time to look at your company with the eyes of an outsider, and to consider questions like these:

  • What does our website and careers page look like? Does it read like a “sorry no vacancy” sign, or is it a welcome mat and a window into our culture? If a talented person came across our site when we didn’t have an active opening, how likely would they be to consider us as a potential career option?
  • How visible and open is our culture? When someone comes onto our sales floor or into our workspace, what kind of image do we present as a team? Who would feel like they belong here—and who might we be excluding?
  • How many of our employees would recommend us to their friends—and what motivation do they have to do so? What have I done in the past when I met someone who could be a future asset to our company? Did I call it a missed opportunity because the timing wasn’t right for one of us? Or did I follow up and start building a relationship? What will I do next time?
  • What is my organization doing to tap into the social and professional networks of our best employees?

Your answers to these questions can reveal what you need to improve to set yourself up to hire right the next time you need someone. Look at what you’re doing, analyze the results, and think about what you can change to be more proactive.

And when you do have a job opening, I can’t say it enough: if you want a team that works, do not settle. It may not be first, or the third, or even the fiftieth candidate who applies, but if you’re attuned to what you want, the right person will come along. And the more you protect your culture by careful hiring, the more attractive you’ll become to the kind of person who wants to work in that culture. And, soon enough, the right people will be coming to you.

 

Clint-Pulver-Undercover-Millenial-Speaker

How to Use “Designed Moments” to Earn Employee Loyalty by Clint Pulver

By Clint Pulver | Sep 30, 2021 | Comments Off

The employees we’ve interviewed who loved where they work had a very specific quality in common: they trusted their managers.

One of the biggest misconceptions we come across in our undercover workplace research is the idea that employees have to earn the trust of their managers. If you are a leader who still views loyalty this way, it’s time to flip your script. Because you can’t expect trust if you haven’t earned it yourself.

The employees we’ve interviewed who loved where they work had a very specific quality in common: they trusted their managers. They knew they could ask for help in a crisis; they knew they could express a worry or a complaint without being punished for it somewhere down the line. And because these employees trusted their leaders—meaning they didn’t have to perform under the weight of anxiety or resentment—they felt free to return that same loyalty.

And we’ve found in our research that they return it by the boatload.

Creating Employee Trust Through Designed Moments

Earning that level of trust from your staff is not about making a big show of what a great pal you are, or what a super cool boss you can be. It’s about little, everyday actions—I call them “designed moments.” These types of moments are the #1 thing that come up when we ask employees to tell us about a manager who inspired unbreakable loyalty.

What is a designed moment? It’s simply a moment of attention and consideration—one that stands out and feels like the opposite of the daily routine. Moments like these can have a sense of wonder to them, giving an employee a deep sense of being noticed, supported, and even cared for. Think of them as a personalized action you can take to turn an ordinary workday into a powerful memory.

Sounds pretty incredible, right? But, it’s more subtle than you think.

Here are just a few real-world examples of designed moments that made a huge impact on the employees we’ve interviewed:

• Inviting the team out for a surprise lunch
• Sending a six-month supply of diapers to an employee who had a new baby
• Launching a GoFundMe campaign for an employee who was having a health crisis
• Picking up the phone and checking in on how an employee was doing after an ambitious project fell through
• “Calling out” an employee’s contribution to a success, and offering a heartfelt thanks
• Recognizing an employee’s specific talents, and the future the manager saw in them

Get the idea? Simple, thoughtful actions, made regularly over time with each employee.

Building a Bank Account of Trust

Do these moments seem small? Well, they are. But it’s their very smallness that packs such a powerful degree of surprise and meaning for the employees who receive them. That’s the amazing thing about designed moments: it isn’t about staging a huge event, like paying for college or sending your employees on a vacation. You’re not holding a lottery, with random big winners. Instead, what you’re doing is making regular deposits of trust.

It’s like building a bank account of loyalty with each of your employees. And, just like with a bank account, when you deposit a lot—even if it’s slowly, in small amounts—you can ask for more in return.

Over time, each of your designed moments—each investment you make in care, attention, and praise—will move your employees closer to a relationship founded in trust, connection, and, yes, even love. But you can only reap those returns if you keep making your deposits.

And I mean with each employee, as often as you can.

Challenge: Create a Designed Moment

There is no recipe for a designed moment—and that’s because they have to be genuine, and—this is the most important thing—they have to be personalized both to the situation and to the employee. So, to determine the best way to design a moment for a given employee, you have to invest your time and interest in that person, and get to know them as an individual: their talents, goals, hopes, dreams, interests—and disinterests, too.

Here’s where to start: with one single employee. Pick someone—perhaps a person you’ve been struggling to connect with—and try to design one moment that will have meaning for that person. Is there a big life event on the horizon you could acknowledge or support? Something they have accomplished at work to celebrate? What kind of action could you take that might startle them out of their daily grind—in a really good way?

Can’t think of anything? That’s a clue you need to start a little further back. Invest some time in getting to know that employee better. Work alongside them. Ask about their lives. Pay a little more attention to how their workday is going. This groundwork will give you better insight into what might make an impact for that individual.

Remember: deposits of trust aren’t about making a big show. They’re about simply being there for your employees, both in the literal and metaphorical sense.

It’s Time to Take Responsibility for Trust

If you want your people to truly commit to you, you first have to earn it. Yes, winning that trust—building those individual bank accounts—takes effort and time (sometimes lots of time). But once you have loyalty, it’s contagious—and it won’t be long before you’ve created a workplace culture in which your whole team has each other’s back.

So, design those impact moments, invest in that loyalty, and keep making those small, everyday deposits of trust. Because if your people trust you, they will give their all for you.

 

Clint-Pulver-Undercover-Millenial-Speaker

The 4 Types of Managers By Clint Pulver by Clint Pulver

By Clint Pulver | Aug 09, 2021 | Comments Off

How to Assess Your Leadership on the Standards–Connection Spectrum

When you interview as many employees as we have in the Undercover Millennial program, you get a lot of insight about what creates a workplace people love. But the super interesting thing happens when we analyze that insight and compare it to a leader’s results. When we do that, two factors become so consistently linked with success that you can actually use them as a framework for assessing managerial performance.

And what are those factors? Standards and Connection.

Now, standards are your expectations for your employees’ behavior and performance, and connection is the level of empathy, recognition, time, and advocacy you offer them. In the conversations we’ve had with employees, we’ve heard consistent descriptions of four specific types of management—and each can be placed on a spectrum of these two elements. And not only that, each of those four styles can actually be linked to specific behaviors among those leaders’ employees.

So, which type of Manager are you?

The Removed Manager

The Buddy Manager

The Controlled Manager

The Mentor Manager

THE REMOVED MANAGER

Low Standards, Low Connection
First let’s look at the Removed Manager. This person leads with low standards, and low connection.

They’re completely removed from their organization and from the people they lead—we’ve seen this separation manifest emotionally, and even physically. They’re hard to find! Maybe they’re in their office, maybe in the back room—maybe they’re not even there. And when you do find them, it can seem like they’re just ticking boxes, and that they don’t really care.

OUTCOME - Disengagement

If hearing this feels uncomfortable, this might be you! And that means you’re probably struggling to connect with and lead your people. Maybe you’re feeling burned out—or maybe you’re even having difficulty connecting with your own boss. But whatever the underlying reason, that disengagement you feel is likely showing up in your people as well.

THE BUDDY MANAGER

Low Standards, High Connection

You get the Buddy Manager—hooray, a buddy, a friend! Yeah, sounds fun—everybody likes a buddy, and, hey, wouldn’t it be great to have a job where you can get away with anything. But hold on: what’s that going to do to your sense of respect for your employer? And how likely are you to feel like you’re building a career that has real meaning? While employees with a Buddy Manager might feel cared for, that’s not actually a good thing if they also feel a lack of real leadership.

If approval and friendship mean more to you than guiding or developing, you might recognize yourself here. You probably bend over backwards to make your team happy in the moment, but you fail to balance that with consistent expectations. And the outcome? Entitlement, complacency, and a lack of professional growth.

OUTCOME – Entitlement

An even bigger risk with Buddy Management is treating some employees differently, making exceptions and granting favors because you like them, or, worse, because you want them to like you. Soon you have some people seeing how far they can stretch your authority, and others feeling resentful, ignored, or shut out.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t have a great relationship with your employees, because you absolutely should! But if friendship becomes more important than what’s best for your employee’s development and performance, your company is going nowhere¬—and the same goes for your employee.

But here’s the tricky balance—the flipside to the Buddy Manager is the Controlling Manager. You’ll recognize yourself here if you have a “my way or the highway” style, with little collaboration and a whole lot of consequences.

THE CONTROLLING MANAGER

High Standards, Low Connection

Do you find that you’re always writing your people up or dressing them down? If you do, you might think you’re just pushing for higher performance, but the real result can be just as bad as with the Buddy Manager. Only in this case it takes the form of rebellion, bitterness, and a different kind of rule breaking—we’ve seen Controlling Management lead to less productivity, more theft, and even intentional mistakes made as a way to express defiance.

OUTCOME – Rebellion

And that doesn’t even begin to include the negative results of what doesn’t happen under this style of management: and that’s collaboration, innovation, and the sense of connection your customers get when they enter a business where people love where they work.

Ah, but now we reach the place where these two elements come together! This is leadership that combines high levels of standards with high levels of connection. This is Mentor Management, and it has without fail reaped the best performance results across all the workplaces we’ve researched.

THE MENTOR MANAGER

High Standards, High Connection

Employees who work for a Mentor Manager feel loyalty, show respect, and engage better with their work. You’re operating as a Mentor Manager when you provide your employees with the standards and expectations they need to feel secure in their job, and at the same time you’re spending time with them—creating meaningful moments and building trust simply by getting to know them. And the result? Respect, and loyalty.

OUTCOME – Respect & Loyalty

Now here’s the big question: for each of those managers, how much of their style do you see in yourself? If you see similarities, does that make you feel good, or uncomfortable? Who could you emulate to help yourself increase the level of standards and connection you are offering your people?

What could you do to increase the levels of both empathy and expectations in your workplace? Your title might make you a boss, but it’s your people who decide if you’re a mentor. And that’s where you want to operate as a leader.

 

Clint-Pulver-Undercover-Millenial-Speaker

How to Determine the Current Status of your Employees by Clint Pulver

By Clint Pulver | Jun 16, 2021 | Comments Off

The 3 Questions You Need to Ask Your Employees Right Now

So here’s kind of a sad story? One day a talented employee gets hired at a business, and she’s full of excitement about the future. But over the weeks and months that promise doesn’t pan out, and she starts to feel stuckFinally, she’s had enough—she hands in her notice. And on her last day, her manager invites her into his office, sits her down, and asks her a question that comes way too late. He asks her, What could we have done to keep you here?”

Tragic, right? I see it all the time, and it breaks my heart! The absolute worst moment you could ask an employee what they want in their life is at an exit interview. It’s like a hospital keeping its heart monitor in the morgue. The best companies we’ve worked with are checking their employee’s vitals all the time, before they get tired of their job. And they don’t just do it with stuffy performance reviews that are more about what the company wants than what the employee wants. They do it with a status interview. This is one of the best practices I’ve seen for consistently maintaining an accurate measure of how your employee is feeling and what they need to perform at their best. And it has three specific elements that might seem in conflict but aren’t: it’s informal, it’s in-the-moment, and it’s comprehensively planned and targeted.

The Status Interview

  • Informal
  • In-the-moment
  • Planned and targeted

Done well, a status interview is not about the company; it’s about the employee: the focus is on being an advocate, and asking what they need and what you can do for them. You need to get the information that will help you plan a route forward, and we’ve found that the most effective way to do that is with three very specific questions: “What can we do to keep you here?”“What’s getting in the way of you reaching your maximum success?”; and “How can I help you get where you want to go?”

The Status Interview Questions

1. “What can we do to keep you here?”

2. “What’s getting in the way of you reaching your maximum success?”

3. “How can I help you get where you want to go?” 

Each one of these questions achieves a different goal, and has to be approached in a specific way. Let’s take the first one: “What can we do to keep you here.”

This is how you acknowledge your employee’s value: that you appreciate what they bring every day. Set them at ease by pairing this question with some vocal praise, like, “Hey, you’re really important to this company, and I want to make sure that you’ve got what you need to be successful. What can we do to keep you here?

1. “What can we do to keep you here?”

  • Inspires loyalty and trust and value
  • Pair with vocal praise 

Asking this question before there’s a problem inspires loyalty and shows them they matter—and adding in that praise lets them know right away that this isn’t a conversation about a problem.

Then that next question shows your employee that you’re invested in boosting their skills and getting them to their goals: “What’s getting in the way of your maximum success?” Here’s what you’re really asking: What skills do you want to learn? How’s your schedule working out? Is anything going on with your health or your family that might be causing you stress? And, most importantly, what can I do as your manager to connect you with resources and get you past those obstacles?

2. “What’s getting in the way of you reaching your maximum success?”

  • Shows support for an employee’s goals
  • Pair with offers of help, training, or resources 
  • Then, you cap it off with the kicker: “How can I help you get where you want to go.”

 As a leader and a mentor, your job is to connect your people to their dreams, even if those dreams have nothing to do with their work. Asking an employee how you can help them get anywhere they want to go in life demonstrates to them that you are their advocateShowing support for an employee’s personal projects actively taps into their excitement. It will re-engage that person, so they can bring that energy and incorporate it into their work. And the beauty of knowing what your employee wants is that you can play to those strengths, and find opportunities within the company to that will move them further toward those dreams.

 3. “How can I help you get where you want to go?”

  • Demonstrates advocacy
  • Pair with help in finding opportunity

But there’s one more critical element to the status interview that you cannot forget—and that’s a relationship that can bear the weight of truth. Your employees need to know that they can tell you what they’re really feeling without risking any anger or retribution from you. You can’t create that kind of strength and confidence just in that moment—you build it over time, through all those little daily deposits of trust that you’re making with your people. It’s true that some employees will never tell you the complete truth, but even then, I promise you that it will have so much meaning that you at least asked, and that you asked authentically and with open intentions. Just remember that this is not your moment to criticize or bring up performance issues. This is support—a check-up, a heart monitor. You’re looking to create that healthy stability, and you’re taking action if you spot any sign that things aren’t great.

So today I want you to look at your schedule for the month ahead, and slot in time for a status interview with every one of your employees. Ask those three questions, pair them with praise, and figure out how you can support their dreams now, even if it seems like everything’s fine. Because an employee’s last day on the job is absolutely the wrong time to find out what could have done to keep them in your company.

 

Clint-Pulver-Undercover-Millenial-Speaker

People Do Business With People They Know, Like, Trust and Value - Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Sep 19, 2016 | Comments Off

Ty Bennett Promo Video ShotThere’s a fundamental rule of business that states: “People do business with people they know, like and trust.” We’ve all heard that, and even repeated it, but ultimately it is wrong.

Ok, maybe wrong is not the right word. But the rule is incomplete. The truth is, people do business with people they know, like, trust and VALUE.

Honesty and likeability are important, but if people don’t see you as valuable, they will never do business with you. If you don’t come across as professional, knowledgeable, and credible with the right skill set to get the job done, you will never be as influential and successful as you would like.

So what do we do about it? How do we make ourselves more valuable? By constantly developing our knowledge, our skills and continually striving to get better. The fundamental rule of Business should read: “People do business
with people they know, like, trust and value”

Reputation is your track record. It is confidence in character and capability over time. Henry Ford said, “You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do,” so reputation only comes after you make the investment. Lasting influence is built and sustained by reputation. People can be influential in a given situation, or for a temporary period of time, but lasting influence is based in reputation. That is why it is so important to guard your reputation, cultivate your reputation, and be a person of character and ever-increasing capability.

See More from Ty!

Tim Sanders - Dealstorming Bootcamp Offer

By cmiadmin | May 02, 2016 | Comments Off

Tim Sanders - Dealstorming Bootcamp Offer

Tim Sanders Promo-Desktop

NEW BOOK by Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | May 02, 2016 | Comments Off

NEW BOOK by Ty Bennett - Partnership is the New Leadership

EB-Ty Bennett-New Book-Apr 12

Women Helping Women: 7 Lessons from Ladies at the Top

By cmiadmin | Mar 29, 2016 | Comments Off

Women Helping Women: 7 Lessons from Ladies at the Top - Includes Michelle Ray

by Helen Drinan at HuffPost

Almost any college president will tell you that there are certain events that are their favorites. Among my most cherished activities are soaking in the excitement and possibility of the first day of class; the mix of emotion and pride during commencements; and a special gathering that my university has hosted for the past 37 years known as the Simmons Leadership Conference.

The conference is considered the preeminent gathering for women’s leadership in the country. Every year, more than 3,300 business women (and some men!) come for a day of renewal, skill building, and sheer inspiration. Over the years our dazzling speaker line-up has included Oprah Winfrey, Madeleine Albright, Meg Whitman, Hillary Clinton, Sally Field, Viola Davis, the late Benazir Bhutto, and Billie Jean King.

Since not everyone can attend the conference, I wanted to share with you some wisdom from this year’s speakers. Enjoy!

#1: Be Daring.

Ping Fu
Vice president and chief entrepreneur officer at 3D Systems

On her most “daring” career move:
Ping Fu: I quit a stable job and started a company when I had a baby girl. This move completely changed the trajectory of my career, my attitude towards my life journey, and my understanding of responsibilities.

What did you learn from that experience?

Ping Fu: The entrepreneurial experience has taught me a few lessons:

  • It is all about love. Love what you do and love the people you serve. It is love that carries the tough days
  • When in doubt, always err on the side of generosity
  • Leadership is a being, not a position. Know who you are
  • Practice trusting and tracking; not commanding and controlling

#2: Your Voice is Powerful - Use It!

Carla Harris
Vice chairman of Global Wealth Management and senior client advisor at Morgan Stanley.

On the female leader she most admires:
Carla Harris: Shirley Chisholm and Barbara Jordan. Both were unafraid to use their voices and extraordinary oratorical skills to get people to listen and to thereby provoke change with their arguments, delivery and compelling logic. They understood that there is power in your voice and that it should never be submerged, for when you submerge your voice, you submerge and lose your power.

#3: Focus on Your Strengths - Be Confident.

Beth Phalen
Senior vice president at EMC Corporation, leads Data Protection & Availability Solutions within the Core Technology Division.

On the best piece of career advice she’s received:
Beth Phalen: The best advice was a while ago, and was basically, “stop putting yourself down.” The message was: “Your strengths speak for themselves. Don’t limit your positive impact by discrediting yourself or minimizing your point of view.” It helped me realize that I can make a contribution and I’m really not helping anyone by not projecting confidence.

#4: Just Do It.

Precillia Redmond
Vice president and manager of organizational effectiveness and strategic project management services at Liberty Mutual Insurance Group

Her tips for work/life integration:
Precillia Redmond: As someone said to me years ago when I complained that I felt guilty all the time - guilty for not spending enough time with my kids, husband, family, work: “Allow yourself to feel the feeling, but do what you need to do anyway.”

#5: Men Play a Role.

Edie Weiner
President and CEO of The Future Hunters

On the major issue or current event women should focus on to effect change:

Edie Weiner: Finding solutions for all of the unemployed, underemployed, and disillusioned young men here in the U.S. and abroad. Nothing destroys the fabric of homes, communities, lives, and the economy as much as disaffected young men with nowhere to develop their talents, interests, economic independence, and civil responsibility. This is a women’s issue! Women, even with the obstacles they encounter, can be strong and supportive. But young men, challenged by war, displacement, poor economic prospects, and biased justice systems pose a significant challenge to their mothers, wives, girlfriends, and children. They are attracted to fiery idealism and quick payoffs. Crime, violence, drug addiction, and terrorism increase, and communities are torn apart. We will have unprecedented refugee problems everywhere, fueled by climate change, wars, and economic collapses. Anthropologists have long known that as go the young males, so goes the civilization. We have to find productive ways to engage our youth, and provide promising paths for their futures

#6. Look to History: Women Role Models Abound.

Michelle Ray
CEO and founder of the Lead Yourself First Institute in Vancouver, Canada.

On the female leader she most admires, and how she has driven change:
Michelle Ray: Golda Meir, who was elected Prime Minister of Israel in 1969 - the first woman to achieve this position anywhere in the world. It wasn’t because she was a woman., but rather, due to the fact that she was a leader. She forged change by supporting diplomatic solutions to finding peace in the Middle East and unrestricted Jewish immigration. She aligned herself and Israel with individuals and countries once considered unlikely “friends” of the Jewish state, thus gaining tremendous respect as a leader. She was ahead of her time. She was confident, charismatic and highly principled.

#7. For Goodness Sake - Help Other Women!

Maggie Ruvoldt
Executive vice and general manager at 2U, Inc., an education technology company that partners with nonprofit colleges and universities to deliver online degree programs

On the major issue or current event women should focus on to effect change:

Maggie Ruvoldt: Opening up the inner networks for other women. When you break into the smaller, unofficial network, don’t close the door behind you.

This blog post is part of a series produced by The Huffington Post and Simmons College, in conjunction with the 37th annual Simmons Leadership Conference - the premier women’s leadership conference in the country - held March 29 in Boston. For more information about the conference, visit here. To follow the conference live, follow #SLC16 on March 29.

 

See More About Michelle Ray Here 

Archives