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Ron Tite on creativity, comedy and why everyone is an artist, or at least should be - Mike Walsh

By cmiadmin | Oct 24, 2016 | Comments Off

Ron Tite is a very funny guy - not to mention, a very creative one. Named one of the 'Top 10 Creative Canadians' by Marketing Magazine, he’s been an award-winning advertising writer and creative director for some of the world’s most respected brands, including Air France, Evian, Hershey, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, Intel, Microsoft, and Volvo. Once a professional comedian, he now helps brands develop their content and storytelling strategy. Executive Producer & Host of the Canadian Comedy Award-winning show Monkey Toast, Ron is also a featured marketing expert on the new Mark Burnett-produced business reality show, Dream Funded. His latest book, ‘Everyone’s An Artist (Or At Least They Should Be)’ explores why the most successful executives and entrepreneurs have learned to think like artists. We caught up in Toronto to talk about the power of reinvention, counterintuitive thinking and how comedy teaches you to rebel and break the rules.

More from Mike Walsh!

Behind the Scenes of Vinh's American Trip

By cmiadmin | Sep 29, 2016 | Comments Off

Get a behind the scenes look at Vinh's American speaking trip!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOYbIUFXCj8

More From Vinh Giang

People Do Business With People They Know, Like, Trust and Value - Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Sep 19, 2016 | Comments Off

Ty Bennett Promo Video ShotThere’s a fundamental rule of business that states: “People do business with people they know, like and trust.” We’ve all heard that, and even repeated it, but ultimately it is wrong.

Ok, maybe wrong is not the right word. But the rule is incomplete. The truth is, people do business with people they know, like, trust and VALUE.

Honesty and likeability are important, but if people don’t see you as valuable, they will never do business with you. If you don’t come across as professional, knowledgeable, and credible with the right skill set to get the job done, you will never be as influential and successful as you would like.

So what do we do about it? How do we make ourselves more valuable? By constantly developing our knowledge, our skills and continually striving to get better. The fundamental rule of Business should read: “People do business
with people they know, like, trust and value”

Reputation is your track record. It is confidence in character and capability over time. Henry Ford said, “You can’t build a reputation on what you are going to do,” so reputation only comes after you make the investment. Lasting influence is built and sustained by reputation. People can be influential in a given situation, or for a temporary period of time, but lasting influence is based in reputation. That is why it is so important to guard your reputation, cultivate your reputation, and be a person of character and ever-increasing capability.

See More from Ty!

We Have Hit Peak Tech - Mike Walsh

By cmiadmin | May 11, 2016 | Comments Off

We Have Hit Peak Tech - Mike Walsh

Is slow tech just a cynical status update or is it here to save us?


Every year, we are rewarded with a new round of technology upgrades. Faster processors, bigger and brighter screens, better cameras — a bounty that promises more rapid selfies, status updates and streaming entertainments. Forget peak oil, we have hit peak tech. For the more enlightened, that means something needs to change.

One of the highlights of the Further Future event in the desert this year, was Eric Schmidt flying in on his chopper to counsel the Mad Max styled crowd to disconnect from their devices and break their addition to technology. Such advice from a former Google CEO is not as ironic as it might sound. Google themselves, concerned for the welfare of their employees, have run experiments such as Dublin Goes Dark, where staff were asked to leave their phones at reception when they finished for the day, to create a better distinction between work and life. They are not alone. France, the perennial defender of La Bonne Vie, is set to pass a law that will allow workers to ignore their email after 6pm.

Behind all of these experiments and debates, is a bigger question about our relationship to technology. Rather than being slaves to the upgrade cycle, people are now talking about the Slow Tech movement. It was actually one of the subjects I spoke about with French entrepreneur and digital philosopher, Tariq KRIM, during the very first episode of my podcast, Between Worlds.

Some of the biggest adherents to the idea of Slow Tech are, nor surprisingly, concerned parents. Those of us born in the seventies, grew up in the shadow of the apparently corrosive influence of television. TV was our generation’s moral hazard, but at least it was controllable. There was a time for homework, a time for family dinner, and a time for reruns of M.A.S.H. In the smartphone age, such delineations are not so easy to make — unless, like one ambitious cafe, you build your dining room as a Faraday cage.

Your devices are getting faster, but you don’t have to.

And yet in a way, design may actually be the best solution to connectivity overload. Rather than designing for ever increasing speed and throughput, we may actually start to imagine products that come with in-built friction, that are designed to slow us down. Think of it as a kind of stomach band for our tech addiction.

The digital Leica M-D camera, sans the ubiquitous LCD screen.

Here are couple of examples:

  • The new Leica M-D is a gorgeous digital camera without a LCD screen, and manual controls for aperture, shutter speed and ISO. It is designed to re-create both the creative focus, and the anticipation that traditionally came with analog film photography.
  • Apps like IA Writer, and devices like the Freewrite, remove the temptations of modern tablets, to offer writers the same distraction-free environment as an old school typewriter did.
  • The Punkt mobile phone has had all of the features of a hyper-connected smartphone surgically incised, and simply allows the user to text and make calls. As its makers explain, ‘The more our phones do, the more they demand of us’.
  • Vinyl sales are having a mighty resurgence. The warmth of the analog sound is only one of the attractions of the medium. Also appealing is the mindfulness that putting on a record requires, as opposed to the instant gratification of streaming an algorithmic playlist.
  • Long form content platforms like Medium are gaining a wider audience, as readers — tired of 140 character updates or moronic click bait lists — seek more reflective alternatives. Even on mobile.

Some might fairly label Slow Tech products and practices as a Luddite reaction to the inevitable ascent of technology. You can’t stop progress, and it is certainly dangerous to try and regulate it into submission. But as co-creators of the future, it is also foolish to completely abdicate aesthetic control over what technology offers us, and how we wish to live.

A faster future is always possible, but is it desirable?

At the same time, we should resist becoming the grumpy elder who has lost touch with the new generation. Maybe several decades from now, if brain interfaces to technology become commonplace, our kids, now themselves parents, will find themselves bemoaning their own children’s habits.

Do you best to suppress your wry grin as you hear them yelling in the next room, ‘Hey! How many times do I have to tell you to stop doing that? I know you are thinking on the computer again. Use an iPad like a normal person for once!’


If you are interested in more of my ideas, you can stalk me on the Web. I spend 300 days a year travelling: researching markets, interviewing clever people, giving talks and looking for the future in the seeds of the present. Drop me a line if you would like me to speak at your next event.

Follow me on Twitter | Watch my talks | Listen to my podcast

Tim Sanders - Dealstorming Bootcamp Offer

By cmiadmin | May 02, 2016 | Comments Off

Tim Sanders - Dealstorming Bootcamp Offer

Tim Sanders Promo-Desktop

NEW BOOK by Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | May 02, 2016 | Comments Off

NEW BOOK by Ty Bennett - Partnership is the New Leadership

EB-Ty Bennett-New Book-Apr 12

Women Helping Women: 7 Lessons from Ladies at the Top

By cmiadmin | Mar 29, 2016 | Comments Off

Women Helping Women: 7 Lessons from Ladies at the Top - Includes Michelle Ray

by Helen Drinan at HuffPost

Almost any college president will tell you that there are certain events that are their favorites. Among my most cherished activities are soaking in the excitement and possibility of the first day of class; the mix of emotion and pride during commencements; and a special gathering that my university has hosted for the past 37 years known as the Simmons Leadership Conference.

The conference is considered the preeminent gathering for women’s leadership in the country. Every year, more than 3,300 business women (and some men!) come for a day of renewal, skill building, and sheer inspiration. Over the years our dazzling speaker line-up has included Oprah Winfrey, Madeleine Albright, Meg Whitman, Hillary Clinton, Sally Field, Viola Davis, the late Benazir Bhutto, and Billie Jean King.

Since not everyone can attend the conference, I wanted to share with you some wisdom from this year’s speakers. Enjoy!

#1: Be Daring.

Ping Fu
Vice president and chief entrepreneur officer at 3D Systems

On her most “daring” career move:
Ping Fu: I quit a stable job and started a company when I had a baby girl. This move completely changed the trajectory of my career, my attitude towards my life journey, and my understanding of responsibilities.

What did you learn from that experience?

Ping Fu: The entrepreneurial experience has taught me a few lessons:

  • It is all about love. Love what you do and love the people you serve. It is love that carries the tough days
  • When in doubt, always err on the side of generosity
  • Leadership is a being, not a position. Know who you are
  • Practice trusting and tracking; not commanding and controlling

#2: Your Voice is Powerful - Use It!

Carla Harris
Vice chairman of Global Wealth Management and senior client advisor at Morgan Stanley.

On the female leader she most admires:
Carla Harris: Shirley Chisholm and Barbara Jordan. Both were unafraid to use their voices and extraordinary oratorical skills to get people to listen and to thereby provoke change with their arguments, delivery and compelling logic. They understood that there is power in your voice and that it should never be submerged, for when you submerge your voice, you submerge and lose your power.

#3: Focus on Your Strengths - Be Confident.

Beth Phalen
Senior vice president at EMC Corporation, leads Data Protection & Availability Solutions within the Core Technology Division.

On the best piece of career advice she’s received:
Beth Phalen: The best advice was a while ago, and was basically, “stop putting yourself down.” The message was: “Your strengths speak for themselves. Don’t limit your positive impact by discrediting yourself or minimizing your point of view.” It helped me realize that I can make a contribution and I’m really not helping anyone by not projecting confidence.

#4: Just Do It.

Precillia Redmond
Vice president and manager of organizational effectiveness and strategic project management services at Liberty Mutual Insurance Group

Her tips for work/life integration:
Precillia Redmond: As someone said to me years ago when I complained that I felt guilty all the time - guilty for not spending enough time with my kids, husband, family, work: “Allow yourself to feel the feeling, but do what you need to do anyway.”

#5: Men Play a Role.

Edie Weiner
President and CEO of The Future Hunters

On the major issue or current event women should focus on to effect change:

Edie Weiner: Finding solutions for all of the unemployed, underemployed, and disillusioned young men here in the U.S. and abroad. Nothing destroys the fabric of homes, communities, lives, and the economy as much as disaffected young men with nowhere to develop their talents, interests, economic independence, and civil responsibility. This is a women’s issue! Women, even with the obstacles they encounter, can be strong and supportive. But young men, challenged by war, displacement, poor economic prospects, and biased justice systems pose a significant challenge to their mothers, wives, girlfriends, and children. They are attracted to fiery idealism and quick payoffs. Crime, violence, drug addiction, and terrorism increase, and communities are torn apart. We will have unprecedented refugee problems everywhere, fueled by climate change, wars, and economic collapses. Anthropologists have long known that as go the young males, so goes the civilization. We have to find productive ways to engage our youth, and provide promising paths for their futures

#6. Look to History: Women Role Models Abound.

Michelle Ray
CEO and founder of the Lead Yourself First Institute in Vancouver, Canada.

On the female leader she most admires, and how she has driven change:
Michelle Ray: Golda Meir, who was elected Prime Minister of Israel in 1969 - the first woman to achieve this position anywhere in the world. It wasn’t because she was a woman., but rather, due to the fact that she was a leader. She forged change by supporting diplomatic solutions to finding peace in the Middle East and unrestricted Jewish immigration. She aligned herself and Israel with individuals and countries once considered unlikely “friends” of the Jewish state, thus gaining tremendous respect as a leader. She was ahead of her time. She was confident, charismatic and highly principled.

#7. For Goodness Sake - Help Other Women!

Maggie Ruvoldt
Executive vice and general manager at 2U, Inc., an education technology company that partners with nonprofit colleges and universities to deliver online degree programs

On the major issue or current event women should focus on to effect change:

Maggie Ruvoldt: Opening up the inner networks for other women. When you break into the smaller, unofficial network, don’t close the door behind you.

This blog post is part of a series produced by The Huffington Post and Simmons College, in conjunction with the 37th annual Simmons Leadership Conference - the premier women’s leadership conference in the country - held March 29 in Boston. For more information about the conference, visit here. To follow the conference live, follow #SLC16 on March 29.

 

See More About Michelle Ray Here 

Ultra Distance Paddling and Project Athena with Robyn Benincasa

By cmiadmin | Mar 09, 2016 | Comments Off

Adventure Sports Podcast

Ep. 142: Ultra Distance Paddling and Project Athena with Robyn Benincasa

480x270_61969

 

Episode Info

Robyn inspires us again with more great stories about multi-hundred mile paddling races as well as helping others to come from huge life challenges to amazing success as overcomers through Project Athena.  Need a dose of kick it and go?  Don't miss this show.

 

See More About Robyn Here 

NEW Video by Ty Bennett

By cmiadmin | Jan 15, 2016 | Comments Off

Ty Bennett-Jan04

 

 

Ty Bennett’s Presentation Tips from Shark Tank

By cmiadmin | Dec 22, 2014 | Comments Off

Ty Bennet’s recent blog post uses a light-hearted example to explain some serious sales concepts. Ty suggested in his corresponding video “I believe that your ability to communicate will make you or break you.” His video (and blog post) break down some core communication concepts that we can learn from the entrepreneurs on Shark Tank.

The Shark Tank TV show follows entrepreneurs as they try to pitch their business/product ideas to millionaire and billionaire investors. Ty has experienced that same pressure as he and his brother built a successful business that now does over $20 million in annual revenue.

The Five Presentation Tips from Shark Tank that Ty outlines are:

 

  1. Personalize Your Presentation
  2. People Buy You
  3. Know Your Numbers
  4. Samples Sell
  5. Tell a Good Story

1. Ty admits that personalizing your presentation sounds like basic advice, but he mentions it because it’s often neglected. People expect personalization in today’s society, and a canned presentation won’t cut it. Ty suggests looking at the Mackay 66 questionnaire to jumpstart your research on your prospects. He also suggests seven simple ways to personalize your presentation, including changing the title of your presentation to fit your audience, vividly describing your audience’s problem so they know you understand, and using the audience name or logo on your slides.

2. The second tip is to remember that presenters, teachers, and leaders really do color their message. Ty writes, “On Shark Tank you will often hear the sharks say, ‘I love you and I would love to do business with you…’ What are they saying? They are saying that they have bought into the entrepreneur, which is the most important part of the pitch.” Ask yourself the questions that Ty gives:

  • Do people like me?
  • Do I connect well with others?
  • Do people find me arrogant?
  • Do people trust me?
  • Do people sense that I only care about myself or do I show genuine care?
  • Do others see the value I can provide?
  • Am I someone people want to partner with?

3. Ty also advises you to Know Your Numbers. You can deliver the perfect spiel, but it will fall apart if you can’t answer questions about pertinent facts and figures. Consider what questions your audience will have, then record their questions or objections and your answers after several presentations. Finally, record your presentations, study them, and then practice answering questions that you didn’t handle well.

4. The entrepreneurs on Shark Tank often win investors by giving them samples. Let your audience experience the product first hand!

5. Finally, tell a good story. It will make you (and your products) relatable, emotional, and multidimensional. Being relatable means you’ll connect with your audience, engaging your audience’s emotions will drive them to act, and being multidimensional will cause you and your products to stand out. Ty has a wealth of storytelling advice in his book The Power of Storytelling.

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