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How To Keep OTHERS Up At Night by Mike Rayburn

By Mike Rayburn | Feb 21, 2022 | Comments Off

 

A Secretary of Defense for the US was once asked a very revealing question: 

“What keeps you up at night?”

That’s important to know, right? What are our weaknesses, what are the threats? 

His answer completely rocked me.

He said, “Nothing. I keep others up at night.” 

What a revolutionary mindset! 

In essence, the safest, most successful approach is to be the one to whom others react, rather than vice versa. 

For my business clients it made me think of the many different approaches and mindsets they each have toward change. Most tell me they are managing change, embracing change, or adapting to change, with entire trainings and programs centered around those. 

These are noble aspirations… if the best you hope to do is survive. 

If, instead you want to thrive, to grow, to profit, to lead, I am inviting you to elevate to a new mindset.

It’s time for you to stop managing change, and start to create change… to lead change. 

I want you to be the ones who define the curve, rather than follow it.

Imagine the transformation you could create if all the time, money and effort you spend teaching your teams how to react to change, you instead spend teaching them to proactively create change - to discover, create and act on new opportunities pre-emptively?

You’d be unstoppable. 

This is the essence of the “What IF Mindset.” 

Yes, sometimes the unexpected happens and we must respond by managing, embracing or adapting. Please recognize, though, these are all reactive postures and we want to move back to proactive change quickly. 

To do this I want you to leverage an interesting phenomenon: When you boldly create and lead change, your response to outside change naturally strengthens, evolves, and in many cases becomes unnecessary. 

In essence, the best defense is a good offense. 

How do we create change? By constantly asking “What if we could that? What if we didn’t do that?” By adopting the “What IF Mindset” for innovation, creativity, radical problem solving, you harness your team’s sense of purpose.

You are surrounded right now by opportunities that you’re missing. From billion-dollar innovations that change the world, to simple productivity changes which supercharge your bottom line.

Together, let’s discover and act on those opportunities by elevating your organizational mindset to one of creating and leading change.

 

Mike-Rayburn-Keynote-Speaker

Change Your World by Changing One Word by Phil M Jones

By Phil M Jones | Aug 12, 2021 | Comments Off

 

How important are your words? Is it possible to change the outcome in sales or in in your relationships when you change just one word?

Bestselling author of, “Exactly What to Say,” Phil M Jones says that is exactly what happened to Jessica, a client of his who is in the real estate world. During his phone call with her, she explained that for a period of time in her business the world of real estate had gone “crazy.” Crazy time to buy, crazy time to sell – the result was that people started behaving kind of crazy.

She decided to change the word “crazy,” that she used to describe the real estate environment, to the word “rapid.” By using this new word, she realized that the time to buy was now, that people needed to act quickly. As a result, her customers realized instantaneously that the time was now to be making decisions, that this was the moment to respond – there was no time for indecision. It changed her world by changing one word.

Think about how you’ve been describing the last 12 to 18 months in your world. Challenging. Stressful. Refreshing. Awakening. Has the adjective you’ve been reaching for to describe what you’ve been through something that is serving you today? Or, is it merely commentary from the past on a personal emotion? If you change that adjective to something more constructive, it will give you something to build on. Choose the word that best enunciates what you been through, that gives you a platform to build from and you will start building and stop looking backwards, wishing life was easier.

Remember this above all else:  When you change your words, you can change your world. Jessica proved that in the example of moving from “crazy” to “rapid.”

How are you changing the words that are enunciating what you’re looking for in your organization right now?


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TV Host | Nat Geo Explorer | Speaker - Chris Bashinelli

By Dori Pominville | Jan 08, 2019 | Comments Off

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jxrRE_mkpQ

Global Citizenship means using our everyday work and lives as a vehicle to grow inwardly and thereby, become the best version of ourselves. Becoming a Global Citizen is not about traveling the world, it is about using the challenges within our individual lives to become stronger and more productive members of the world. When we embody the qualities of a Global Citizen - presence, empathy and inspiration - then we can truly inspire those around us.

With the mindset of the Global Citizen, every challenge in our work and lives - from a disagreement with a coworker, to the loss of someone we love - becomes fuel for us to grow inwardly and reach our potential. Our role is not to “change the world”, but to “change ourselves”. Becoming a Global Citizen begins with realizing we already have everything we need in order to be happy right now.

From the slums of Haiti, to the fields of Uganda, to the Mongolian Steppe, Chris pulls from real life examples to illustrate that the key to productivity, meaning and connection, does not lie in changing our external conditions, but in transforming our current conditions in order to grow.

Learn more about Bash here!

Behind the Scenes of Vinh's American Trip

By cmiadmin | Sep 29, 2016 | Comments Off

Get a behind the scenes look at Vinh's American speaking trip!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOYbIUFXCj8

More From Vinh Giang

The company with no secrets - Mike Walsh

By cmiadmin | Sep 15, 2016 | Comments Off

Does radical transparency work, or is it just a culture gimmick?


Some of the b1-0sgbkbljrg0x5w39pp28ugiggest sources of stress inside organizations are secrets. When a new boss is appointed, merger talks begin or layoffs are rumored, everyone goes into threat response mode. Personal survival is paramount, and people lose focus and stop creating valuable work.

Some companies are seeking to address this issue by making as much information available as is legally possible. The social media startup Buffer for example, publishes a report every month detailing the growth in its user base, revenue and total cash position. It publishes how much is paid to its workers and how it calculates those numbers. Strangely, rather than deterring employees, this approach has actually led to more job applications.

When I interviewed Brian Halligan, the CEO of Hubspot, he told me the story of how a few years into starting his business he had joined a group of CEOs who met regularly in Boston. At one particular meeting, the topic was culture. Brian had gone to the session thinking that the subject was a complete waste of time, until he sat next to the CEO of iRobot — who was not only brilliant but read him the riot act on culture. That same week, Hubspot surveyed their employees, and discovered that only half of them really liked working there. At that point he and his team decided to study the issue intensely. Their key assumption was that if the way people work and live had changed, the way they led and organized people also had to adapt.

Brian quickly realized that the real issue was transparency. Secrets created politics, especially in fast growing companies. He wanted his employees to trust him, and for him to be able to implicitly trust them too. They started sharing more information. They posted the notes from boardroom meetings on the wiki. They adopted a single policy of “use good judgment”. Employees could submit questions, which would be handled at the company meeting.

In Brian’s words, they had their toughest employees monitor the founders at this session, to make sure that none of them got let off the hook. And yet, ironically enough, it was similar attempts to get off the hook that recently got Hubspot in trouble, their CMO fired, and an FBI investigation triggered by alleged attempts to hush the bestselling book, ‘Disrupted’ by former employee Dan Lyons.

Extreme disclosure is not for everyone, especially when it comes at the price of surveillance. At $150 billion hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, the firm has a policy of taping all meetings. A recent complaint by a former employee described the environment of constant video surveillance as a ‘cauldron of fear and intimidation’. According to the report by the NYT, recordings of controversial meetings were frequently archived and later shown to employees as part of the company’s policy of learning from mistakes.

Secrets can be powerful. They can protect the vulnerable, keep competitors at bay, and safeguard national interests. But they can also breed mistrust and in companies, divert energy from more productive pursuits.

So as you weigh up the design of your own culture — ask yourself, how much time do the people in your business spend worrying about their own survival rather than the survival of your business?

ILTA Keynote - Mike Walsh

By cmiadmin | Sep 01, 2016 | Comments Off

This year, a central theme at ILTACON is ‘change’. How to accept that change is happening, how to cope with it, and what to expect from the waves of change washing over the technology landscape in legal services.

To that end, the keynote was delivered by Mike Walsh, a futurist who brings an eye-opening view of the future into focus. A key insight for me: the future (which is very near) will be different in ways we cannot easily envision, so seek ‘outsiders’ to learn about their vision of the world (from the 5 year old playing with an smart-phone to the college intern multi-tasking between Facebook, texting, and assembling those binders for the partner meeting….

A few key take-aways for me:

> ‘When you hire someone fresh out of college, ask what they find most strange about the way your teams work, make decisions and communicate’. It often takes someone with a fresh view, to accurately compare the habits in your firm to the habits that already exist in the brave new world.

> The future will be driven by real-time data. And lots of it. This is perhaps the single most important understanding of our futures that I can think of. This data will be consumed by AI platforms and humans and will transform organizations from the ground-up, dramatically changing how we make decisions.

> ‘Hire for agility’. You can train someone to do most tasks in a job, but the skill of being able to react quickly to new information is more innate.

The entire keynote presentation is available for download. Just visit http://www.mike-walsh.com/go and ask Mike for a copy of his ILTA Keynote presentation. Its essential reading for everyone from your managing partner to HR to the Manager of Secretarial Services.

See More from Mike!

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