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4 Keys to Make Habits Stick by Stacey Hanke

By Stacey Hanke | May 16, 2022 | Comments Off

 

Repetition creates automation. Getting better at anything requires deliberate practice.

Think about the hours one might spend at basketball practice, shooting hoops and mastering drills. These skills eventually become automatic. The same is true for you! We all want to be influential, but few deliberately practice communication skills until they stick.

When we practice, actions become habit and the brain no longer needs to get involved. The body can automatically complete an action while allowing your brain to focus on the strategic aspects of a conversation – not the delivery. Deliberate practice requires feedback for development to improve.

Think back to when you learned how to drive. Your parents taught you when to change gears, brake or accelerate – all while following the rules of the road. It was challenging and frustrating. Just when you got the hang of one thing, it was time to learn something new. Eventually, your practice paid off. Now, you just get in your car and drive.

Being an influential communicator doesn’t just happen. It requires deliberate practice coupled with ongoing feedback from someone you trust.

Four steps to grow your influence and have others act on what you have to say.

1. Break it Down

We’ve heard the saying “quality over quantity.” The same holds true for improving your influence skills. Start first by recording yourself in an upcoming interaction – whether it’s in-person or virtual. Immediately review the playback. Write down everything you see that needs improvement. Then, break it down into manageable pieces. Focus on one habit at a time. Repeated deliberate practice executed in short bursts at regular intervals is better than working on something all day. Practicing in short durations will reinforce your subconscious, creating permanent long-term habits.

2. Put in the Work

Learning something new requires repeated exposure. Studies show that some habits can be solidified with 7 hours’ worth of practice, while others can take up to 7,000. I promise you will see substantial changes in your daily interactions if you’re willing to put in the concentrated effort for each interaction. Set aside five minutes each morning and write down the skills you’re willing to commit to throughout the day. Carry it around with you as a reminder to remain focused in each conversation. You’ll be surprised how quickly your habits begin to change.

3. Get Clear

Goals partnered with practice become a powerful motivator, creating the momentum needed for ongoing improvement. It’s easier to stay motivated when we see ourselves getting better. We get comfortable being uncomfortable because we know change lies ahead. Get clear on what specifically you want to accomplish in the next 30 days. Focusing on 30 days at a time will create instant changes to your influence skills.

4. Seek Immediate Feedback

Practice makes permanent, so what you practice matters. Seeking immediate feedback is crucial to reinforcing what you’re doing and why. Don’t settle for “you did great.” Instead, ask for specific feedback on exactly what worked and what still needs work. Specific feedback helps you create a plan to immediately focus on skills in need of improvement. If you want to grow your influence, start by determining which communication skills need improvement.

Make the commitment today to take to your communication skills from good to influential. It’s worth the work!

Contact us about booking Stacey for your next event!

 

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How Technology Fuels the Hybrid Workplace by Mike Walsh

By Mike Walsh | May 09, 2022 | Comments Off
 

Imagine your life in the future. Is it a world of robots, self-driving cars and day trips to Mars? What if the future isn't just a distant upgrade? But a tech-powered invitation to live our lives differently, right now.

Imagine if you could speak over 100 languages at once? What if words weren't a barrier to being understood? By anyone? Anywhere? Instant translation changes everything.

The power of unleashing many minds and all our working as one. The creative collision of different cultures and new ideas - creates connections across the globe.

When being understood means you feel seen and included.

Imagine if you could work your way… forever. A shared experience whether you’re 5, 50 or 5000 kilometers from the rest of your team. You are tapping into a new, cultural operating system that accepts how we can connect with the world.

Hybrid working is inclusive work. The idea that you must go to a place to get anything done is ancient history.

But great things also happen in-person. Imagine if you had control of every environment? Every movement is part of something connected — from screen to screen, home to office and everywhere in between.

Collaboration tools like WebEx have changed everything.

So, find your space in a system. Escape noise and distractions to listen and be heard. To think, and to breathe. Because wellbeing is as important as productivity.

To find the future of work with smart questions and even smarter technology, the future is now.

 

Mike-Walsh-Futurist-Speaker

Business Disruption That Wins by Phil M Jones

By Phil M Jones | May 02, 2022 | Comments Off

What did Uber look at? They looked at a process that sucked.

Learn more about Phil M Jones >

Uber disrupted an industry massively, yes? And they really made a dent.

Here's what they didn't invent. They didn't invent traveling by motorcar. They didn't invent traveling in the back of the motorcar.

They didn't even invent traveling in the back of the motorcar with somebody else driving who was paid to do so.

All of that stuff existed.

What did they look at? They looked at a process that sucked.

Does anybody remember ordering a Minicab? Let's see if the process, my experience, is anything like yours.

So, you need to get to the airport tomorrow morning. You need to be there for 9am. So, what you do is you call today to book the Minicab. It will take you about an hour to get there, so you ask it to be with you at 8 am.

Reasonable conversation happens, Minicab is booked. 8:02 am the next morning, where's the Minicab? It's not there, right? So, you're making a phone call through and what do they say?

What do they say, “It’s on its way!”

What did they say next? 8:17, it clearly wasn't around the corner, was it? Finally arrives. You get into the car after putting your own bag in the trunk.

You get into the car and the driver says, “What? Where are you going?”

I'm like, “I told you this yesterday!”

But you politely tell them anyway, right?

And then they say, “Which route do you want to take to get there?”

And you're like, “That's your job!

But anyhow, you still navigate them to be able to get there. Finally, you get to the destination, correct? Running a little later than anticipated.

They say, “That's $37.42.”

So, you hand them your credit card and they say, “Cash only.”

So, you rummage around in your bag finding the only cash you could find. You hand them a $50 bill and they say, “No change!”

So, Uber show up - create a process that is slightly more efficient for the consumer than that - and what did the Minicab companies do?

They say, “It's not fair. Just, not fair!”

And how well did that work out for them? Didn't work out too good did it?

They stomped their feet, they tried to push through legislation. They said every version of, “It's not fair.”

Yet still, who won? The consumer won. Not Uber. The consumer decides what level of service they're looking for. Not the company. The consumer decides.

And Uber won because they put the consumer first.

 

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